what is the deal with the pirate threat in somalia?

in todays day and age, how is it that countries cant deal with a group of self trained, self funded pirates attacking ships? im pretty sure the U.S. has air and navy bases close by. cant they just use satellite radar to get a couple jets in there and blow them the hell out of the water when they look lilke theyre gonna make a move on a ship? r they not doing this out of incapability or is it some b.s. about UN international ROE laws?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    The problem in Somalia is quite complex.

    The government in Somalia is for the most part powerless. The pirates are often considered to be heroes in the Somalian towns because they often bring back money and help feed the people in these towns.

    There are tons of these pirates, and there are quite a few ships using this transit. Keep in mind the area they need to protect is 100s of square miles. Our boats are slow, it takes quite a lot of time to intercept a pirate ship.

    It is far too expensive to have our military protecting boats of foreign nations. The only way this will get resolved is if these cargo boats start carrying their own arms for protection.

    FYI: Satellite based radar is not operational yet.

    --- edit ---

    100s of square miles... I meant over 1 million square miles. I was surprised to find out that the area they are now operating in is so large. 3 times the size of Texas by the accounts of some news organizations.

  • 1 decade ago

    You ever hear of "Black Hawk Down?"

    Do some research on that, the U.S. went into Somalia then to stop clans from raiding food and supplies to the people of Mogadishu.

    Why did we go? The Media had stories everynight in 1992 about the suffering in Mogadishu and the public pressure forced the government to act. However; when the election of 1992 came people forgot about it. Then after the election we started to care again. President Clinton sent task force Ranger. When footage of a dead soldier being drug though Mogadishu was televised we pulled out.

    My point?

    It's not an important issue to the American public, therefore not an important issue for the American Government. If it were the first image of something going wrong would send it into a tailspin and we would bail on Somalia again. They probaly don't want us there because we just cut our losses and abandon them again.

  • 1 decade ago

    Bottom line is, the world fears Somali fighters, pirates, militia, warlords, whoever they are. Secondly, you navigate 100 miles off their coast while ordinary Somalis suffer, without food, water and some guys decided to take matters into their own hands, by hijacking the millionaire ships. Ships knew Somalia had no NAVY or government and use Somali waters without permission, fish there illegally and sometimes dump waste in Somali waters.

    This is not piracy, it is patrolling their own waters. I am sure the reason many countries are ignoring this is because they support the "pirates".

  • It has been going on for hundreds of years if not longer. It can only be dealt with economical re-enforcing the region, and a joint naval intervention in the region, with the countries involved, not so much the US, but a coalition of governments in the area. We need to step back, lend technical support, but they must do the "Ground Work", Per say. The US is not the "Mother, watching out for her babies", for the rest of the world. They can deal with things lon their own, unless they ask for help, we need to realize that.

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  • 1 decade ago

    From satellite, you can't tell if it's a fishing boat or a small pirate ship. Not to mention that U.S. forces are already spread thin but I don't think that would be a problem.0

    Edit: I didn't copy m1a1mike, he just posted his answer a few seconds before I did, when I was typing in mine.

  • 1 decade ago

    Because everybody is afraid of getting hammered by the news media about 'war crimes.'

    It is simply too difficult to tell the difference between an innocent fishing boat and a group of pirates before they start shooting.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I have to agree with Mad Max. The real culprit is the Somolia gov't (corrupt, powerless and fails to bring true stability) and of course, it's economy. Let's face it, if they had jobs, they wouldn't have to resort to a 150 year old risky venture ...as pirates.

    Source(s): Good luck.
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    we try to avoid bombing hostages.

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