Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureReligion & Spirituality · 1 decade ago

Did Christians burn the library of Alexandria to hide Paul's plaigeriem.?

“There is strong reason to believe that St. Paul fabricated the belief system of Christianity from Zoroastrian mythology. In order to hide Paul’s plaigerism… Christians burned the library of Alexandria in 390 A.D. Books in that library kept Mithra’s original story of what Pauline Doctrine is an almost exact copy. (George Sarton , Introduction to History of Sciences)

Paul was supposedly born and raised in the city of Tarsus, a region in SE Asia-Minor (now called Turkey) where Mithra was well known. Biblical scholars are now saying that Paul, the alleged author of 13 out of the 27 (maybe more) books of the New Testament, may have been influenced in his writings by this strong religion of Mithraism. We can see a profound kinship between Mithraism and Christianity.

In-as-much as Mithraism was so popular in Rome, it is no wonder why the pagan Emperor Constantine, who believed in the sun god, Mithras, designated a certain day of the week to him, Sunday, which means, “the day of the sun.”

The original "Christian" faith became a mix of pagan, Mithramic, Jeudeo/Christian teaching. This lead to the confusing mix of theology that we have today within the "Christian" community. This apostacy from the original simple and plain teachings of Christ was accelerated by the persecutions and killings of any who tried to support the "old" ways. Maybe this solves the mystery of the “ungodly” marriage between Mithraism and the cult of Jesus. As it turns out, it was all for political convenience! But, Christians think they are better than that today. In short: The "Christianity" they have today has almost no relationship, in doctrine or in way of life, to the "the original teachings of Jesus."

Update:

Did Paul take the life of a beloved rabbi, Yeshua ben Yoseph, and apply the story of Mithra to invent a Christ?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Honestly, I don't know a huge amount about what is known definitively about Mithraism, but from what I have heard, there are more than a few similarities. However, there are also some very close connections with other religions, such as some of the Egyptian deities, the exact name of which eludes me...Osiris i think...

    It wouldn't be the first time that Paul, the self proclaimed apostle who never met Jesus has been accused of fabricating most of Christianity from pagan cloth...come to think of it, James, the brother of Christ and the leader of the apostles who did meet Jesus was constantly at odds with Paul. odd that. Odd that Paul so disliked James and the other apostles...

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  • 1 decade ago

    The answer is a simple no!

    There is a whole realm of revisionist teachings out there. None of which I take vary seriously. From things like the "Jesus Seminar" which claims to be searching for the "Historic Jesus" to questions like this, they are all grasping at straws to re-write history, and minimize the importance Jesus Christ and His Church.

    In taking that position you would have to discount all scripture New and Old. There is such just too much interrelation and interdependence between the testaments. One person could not have been responsible!

    Besides what could possibly prompt a zealot like Paul who was ferociously persecuting Christians to suddenly switch teams, other than an up close and personal encounter with God?

    Kindest Regards,

    Fr. Michael Callahan

    Source(s): Seminary Studies, 10 years as a priest, and 40 years as a Christian -- Just call it life long learning.
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  • 1 decade ago

    What an interesting theory. Of course, it totally negates the fact that Paul was a disciple of the great Jewish teacher

    Gamaliel when he left Tarsus and went to Jerusalem. And if he had contact with people who knew Mithra or had any influence from Mithraism in his thoughts, he would not have become a Jewish leader (which is what he was when he got permission from the High Priest to go persecuting the followers of Jesus). A bit one off, I would say, about that theory. But it makes for a good story

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It's a nice story.

    "Ancient and modern sources identify four possible occasions for the destruction of the Library:

    Julius Caesar's Fire in The Alexandrian War, in 48 BC

    The attack of Aurelian in the Third century AD;

    The decree of Theophilus in 391 AD;

    The Muslim conquest in 642 AD or thereafter.

    "It's inherently difficult to get reliable information about an event that consisted of the destruction of all recorded information," wrote Neal Stephenson in his December 1996 Wired magazine article, "Mother Earth Mother Board"."

    ~

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  • Mike K
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    Hello,

    Hard to know for sure. More speculation I think.

    If memory serves me correctly, Julius Caesar 48 BC years before Christ burned the Library Of Alexandria when fighting to restore Cleopatra to the throne.The ancient accounts by Plutarch,[9] Ammianus Marcellinus, and Orosius agree to this. Although not confirmed in the accounts of contemporary historians, these accounts do suggest that the Library was a thing of the past when Plutarch was writing around AD 100. Strabo, who lived in Alexandria in 20 BC, wrote about the Library in such a way as to imply that it no longer existed in his time.

    Other accounts suggest that the library was functional until its destruction by the invading Arab Muslim armies in the 7th century.

    Cheers,

    Michael Kelly

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The library contained vast sources of knowledge, that is why it was burned. Ignorant people are easier to control...like cattle. I'm sure anyone who's read the history of religion can see that most of Paul's writing is clearly plagiarism.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    no, Paul consulted about all his writings with St. James the lesser and James was with Christ at his Resurrection. James is the nephew of the virgin Mary. I am named after St. James the Lesser or also known as St. James the Just. this is the history of the Christian faith. read it. Ecclesiastical history is the scientific investigation and the methodical description of the temporal development of the Church considered as an institution founded by Jesus Christ and guided by the Holy Ghost for the salvation of mankind. In a general way the subject matter of history is everything that suffers change owing to its existence in time and space; more particularly, however, it is the genetical or natural development of facts, events, situations, that history contemplates. The principal subject of history is man, since the external changes in his life affect closely his intellectual interests. Objectively speaking, history is the genetical development of the human mind and of human life itself in its various aspects, as it comes before us in series of facts, whether these pertain to individuals, or to the whole human race, or to any of its various groups. Viewed subjectively, history is the apperception and description of this development, and, in the scientific sense, the comprehension of the same set forth in a methodical and systematic manner. The history of mankind may have as many divisions as human life has aspects or sides. Its noblest form is the history of religion, as it developed in the past among the different groups of the human race. Reason shows that there can be only one true religion, based on the true knowledge and the proper worship of the one God. Thanks to the light of revelation we know that this one true religion is the Christian religion, and, since there are different forms of the Christian religion, that the true religion is in particular the one known as Catholic, concrete and visible in the Catholic Church. The history of Christianity, therefore, or more properly the history of the Catholic Church, is the most important and edifying part of the history of religion. Furthermore, the history of religion is necessarily a history of religious associations, since the specifically human, that is, moral—and therefore religious—life, is necessarily social in character. Every religion, therefore, aims naturally at some form of social organization, Christianity all the more so, since it is the highest and most perfect religion. There are three stages in the formation of religious associations:

    Source(s): www.catholic.org and find St. James the Lesser and go to this website to read the rest of the document. http://oce.catholic.com/index.php?title=Ecclesiast...
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  • 1 decade ago

    Seek to know the Gospel by those who live it in it's fullness and not by those outside of the tradition, such as the author of this book you mentioned. This is perfected in the Orthodox Christian monastic life. If you can, save up some money and visit Mt. Athos.

    What you have quoted is almost comical. It's like saying the Republican party was started by Abraham Lincoln, who stole ideas from natives in the Congo.

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  • 1 decade ago

    That's an interesting theory. To the person who said Christ wasn't a rabbi, He was addressed as teacher. What do you think a rabbi is?

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  • 1 decade ago

    Sounds like a real stretch of a conspiracy theory to me.

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