Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsAstronomy & Space · 1 decade ago

Shock waves from supernovae disrupt an interstellar cloud and prevent it from forming stars.?

True or false?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    False, they compress interstellar clouds allowing them to form into stars.

    Here's a good example:

    http://khartnettpoetry.typepad.com/photos/uncatego...

    The cluster of big stars at the bottom of the picture is producing supernovas. The shockwaves are seen colliding with the pink hydrogen nebula toward the top of the picture. If you look closely, you can see protostars forming within, which look like little blobs, like this:

    http://www.fas.org/irp/imint/docs/rst/Sect20/orion...

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Shock waves from supernovae travel for tens or even hundreds of light years in every direction from the exploded star. Any interstellar gas and dust in their path will be compressed and swept up and you can see evidence of this effect in pictures of the Veil Nebula in Cygnus. As the shock waves expand and sweep up gas and dust, they slow down and lose energy, just like ripples in a pond. Stars inside the loops are more numerous than outside of it because there's less interstellar dust and gas to absorb light from the stars beyond. If there is enough gas and dust in the area, it will be compressed enough for the cloud to collapse, fragment and spawn possibly thousands of stars. In addition to triggering the collapse of interstellar clouds, supernovae also put large amounts of heavier elements, including numerous highly radioactive isotopes of aluminum, cobalt, nickel, uranium and many others into these clouds. When they collapse into proto stars and planetary systems, the heavy elements and radioactive isotopes become part of these stars and planetary systems and leaving their traces behind. Meteorites and rocks on the Earth show traces of these supernovae blasts that created the heavier elements that make up the Solar System, the Earth and us. Repeated supernovae in the same region of space often occur in a young and massive star cluster or loose stellar grouping of massive stars called an association. In this way, a large molecular cloud will be turned into stars, with the rest of the gas and dust being driven back into interstellar space as emission nebulae or supernovae remnants.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Back when I was a kid, we didn't have Yahoo Answers to get thousands of people from around the world to do our homework for us. We had to engage in an activity known as "studying." Lucky you for being lazy and unethical.

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