Could anyone tell me the italian tempo terms and their ranges in BPM?

You know... Like Largo, Adagio, Allegro, Allegretto, etc.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    here's most of them

    * Prestissimo — extremely fast (200 and above bpm)

    * Vivacissimamente — adverb of vivacissimo, "very quickly and lively"

    * Vivacissimo — very fast and lively

    * Presto — very fast (168–200 bpm)

    * Allegrissimo — very fast

    * Vivo — lively and fast

    * Vivace — lively and fast (≈140 bpm)

    * Allegro — fast and bright or "march tempo" (120–168 bpm)

    * Allegro moderato — moderately quick (112–124 bpm)

    * Allegretto — moderately fast (but less so than allegro)

    * Allegretto grazioso — moderately fast and gracefully

    * Moderato — moderately (108–120 bpm)

    * Moderato espressivo — moderately with expression

    * Andantino — alternatively faster or slower than andante

    * Andate Moderato- a bit faster than andate

    * Andante — at a walking pace (76–108 bpm)

    * Tranquillamente — adverb of tranquillo, "tranquilly"

    * Tranquillo — tranquil

    * Adagietto — rather slow (70–80 bpm)

    * Adagio — slow and stately (literally, "at ease") (66–76 bpm)

    * Grave — slow and solemn

    * Lento — very slow (40–60 bpm)

    * Larghetto — rather broadly (60–66 bpm)

    * Largo — very slow (40–60 bpm), like lento

    * Larghissimo — very very slow (20 bpm and below)

  • 4 years ago

    BPM as if music was governed by a quartz-locked clock. Music flows; descriptive Italian (or other language) tempo markings are suggestions and ranges. If the composer wanted to be more specific he would give you a metronome marking. ... Just like "mf" doesn't mean every note can be expressed as "0x9 <note number> 64" "0x8 <note number> 0" (As in MIDI note on, medium velocity followed by note off, 0 velocity)

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