Why can't we have Internet via radio waves?

It's pretty damn fast data transfer, isn't it? So what's wrong with using that instead of cables? It definitely isn't as secure, but I don't see why it couldn't be made as secure as a WEP-keyed wireless connection.

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    We can't have Internet via radio waves simply because we have magnetic distorsions that are coming from the Universe, Sun, Earth and so on. When the sun has solar explosions and those are reaching the Earth, all communications are interrupted or suffer great delays. Also the radio waves are loosing from signal strength when they reach forests, walls etc...So it's not only the security, the protocol TCP/IP is the same for cables or radio waves, it is the nature that interfeers with the radio waves.

    You can read a complete explanation about the propagation of radio waves, it shows you how radio waves are blocked and what they need to propagate well on earth. No one will give you a better understanding than this explanation.

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  • Tammie
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

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    There's a technical problem. Internet access requires a lot of "bandwidth". An Internet provider services many users. So they needs a huge amount of "bandwidth". That means the Internet providers use very high frequencies, higher than most amateurs use, and not capable of long distance travel on the Earth's surface. They don't bend like "short wave" radio signals. Either they use a satellite (the high frequencies go far in a straight line), or in industrialized areas (clearly not applicable here), an array of local antennas, much like cellphones. Traditional "short-wave" radio is not used for Internet access. Not enough bandwidth.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    That's OLD technology. http://tapr.org/

    I used to run a forum that way. But it can't be done by wifi technology - the range is just too short. (There was one link that ran, in a single hop, from the east coast of the US to the west coast. On the east coast we had a network that ran from Florida to Maine. (Since the bandwidth was limited, so was the speed - in the 80s, most work was still being done at 1200bps - 1.2kbps - very slow. But we still downloaded files.)

    If you're talking about wifi, that's exactly what it is - it eliminates the wire from the modem to the computer. you can't run from the provider to the users with a single radio channel - the bandwidth isn't available. 300mbps doesn't split out to too many people. A fiber optic cable can carry MUCH more data. But there are a few places where it's done by wifi - you just need dozens (if not hundreds) of individual hotspots to cover even one small city..

    Source(s): 51 years of ham radio experience.
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  • 1 decade ago

    We do have this, and have had it for years. It isn't cheap.

    There is a guy who was riding around the world on his bike, and his bicycle had a satelite dish on it that used microwaves to stay on-line the whole time he was bicycling.

    As you point out, many people today have wireless internet in their homes. Some communities have setup public wireless internet in various parts of their city. Even where this is not public, often people have their wireless router setup insecurely - I once saw a map of New York's Central park detailing where you can get a wireless signal.

    Lastly, you can get a broadband card from various cell phone providers these days.

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  • 1 decade ago

    You will see this happen in 2009. The FCC just auctioned off the part of the electromagnetic spectrum that we onced used for television broadcast signals (recieved from the antenna not from cable). Once television goes digital in February, this part of the spectrum will be free for internet use. Verizon won the auction and will soon be providing wireless internet access from anywhere you can recieve a television signal. Also, Microsoft and Google have just received approval for white band devices that use the small spaces in between the frequencies for each television channel (these spaces were created to prevent channels from bleeding into one another). These devices will come internet enabled off the shelf (so you will see things like internet enabled toasters or refrigerators or music players) with speeds that are faster than current WiFi technology. Of course, this isn't actually internet via radiowaves, but it provides the same benefits that I think you have in mind.

    http://www.aei.org/publications/filter.all,pubID.2...

    http://www.shellypalmermedia.com/2008/11/09/white-...

    Source(s): Google News www.physorg.com
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  • 1 decade ago

    ok first of all, radio waves have a certain limit of range, to increase its range, more power must be implented, but more power means using more resources. right? next it can be succeptible to hackers especially to online shopping or transaction, and also for emails and private messaging like yahoo messenger, then radio waves can be easy to tapped with, even thouhg its coded, people are wise enough to decode it how hard is it, then when it rain or some interference caught with your signal, it can stop the connection between you and the server and thta means to total carnage especially if playing online games,

    hope i answered your question thorougly

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  • 4 years ago

    Certainly, there are internet companies that use wireless broadband. Personal computers are connected to a wireless broadband which also connects by radio waves to a distant station.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Radio waves are a transmit-receive kind of thing. It requires a great deal of power to transmit them over a relatively short distance. Your internet would be local, and that's it. Also, you would only be able to receive, not send, which is a big part of the internet. To send an email, you would need 40 thousand watts of power to get it across town. You would also need a giant tower to broadcast the radio waves.

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