Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Food & DrinkVegetarian & Vegan · 1 decade ago

Insects killed by pesticides?

Do any of you have an issue eating non-organic food because of the insects killed by the pesticides. Im a vegan and dont eat honey because of the bees killed but apparently there are more insects killed per kilogram of vegtables from the pesticides then there are bees killed per kilogram of honey - should all vegans be eating organic only? if yes what about cotton for clothing and all these other plant products we use?

Update:

your right it does count as being vegan but im not thinking in the way of fiting into the definition. Thinking in the way of trying to avoid animal suffering

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Yes I do have an issue with it. I eat solely organic food (I have been vegetarian all my life, vegan 5 years and organic 3 years) and only buy organic textiles (or secondhand) and toiletries etc.

    Yes a few (7, some are for fungal disease though, not insects) organic pesticides are allowed, but in the UK at least they have to get special permission each time, and they have to explain how they will avoid having to use them again (i.e. improve their growing system). It still kills far less animals than using them all the time.

    It's not only insects pesticides kill, but also animals which eat the insects - the concentration of toxins increases at each stage of the food chain so some birds of prey are almost extinct because of this. DDT (which was banned many years ago in most countries) is still found in penguins - so it is still doing damage even now.

    And of course pesticides are made by unethical companies (e.g. AstraZeneca) which test them and their other products on animals.

    Some additives in non-organic food are tested on animals (it's as bad as using animal-tested toiletries, surely?), and non-organic GM food may even contain animal genes, e.g. they have put fish 'anti-freeze' genes in strawberries.

    As someone mentioned it is bad for the farmers' health too. There are many farmers who have died of cancer from pesticide exposure. This is a problem particularly in developing countries where they can't afford protective clothing when spraying. [NB: some organic cotton is fair-trade when it's made from the cotton bolls into material, but the actual end result - clothes - may still be made in sweatshops, so watch out!]

    And pesticide run-off from fields contaminates rivers and kills aquatic animals and those which drink the water. Have you seen pictures of the dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico? That's due to fertiliser and manure run-off!

    By using artificial fertilisers we are also depleting our fertile topsoil - it should be 6' deep on average but it is 6" - as it's so shallow and we are chopping down more trees we are losing even more as it gets washed away by rainfall. It's a vicious cycle as it means we need more fertilisers to get the same yield - we should be planting green manures in rotation instead to improve the soil.

    Organic farming is more sustainable in general - for example organic palm oil is grown without destroying the forests where orangutans live, and you won't find much slash-and-burn in the Amazon for organic agriculture! [Some mostly organic products can contain non-organic soya lecithin, most of which is produced by Cargill, a terrible company - look up their record! So look out for that.]

    Organic farming still uses some animal inputs (e.g. manure, unless you find a stock-free organic farm!), but it is FAR more ethical than non-organic food. You could also grow some of your own food, in a windowbox, garden or allotment (diluted human urine is a good free fertiliser, and you can compost your food waste to reuse on the soil).

    It doesn't have to be expensive - my partner and I have a total income of £16,000 (well below average) and we feed ourselves and a dog and 4 guinea pigs all on vegan and organic food. Clothes/linen are more expensive when organic but if you only buy what you really need it's affordable. Or get secondhand if you really can't do it.

    We get a vegetable box (all is British, some is from local allotments and the rest is from farmers in our region) for £12 a week, and the rest of our food comes from a wholefood wholesaler - we buy e.g. a 25kg sack of rice twice a year for £20.

    I think the USDA organic standards are more lax than the UK ones, so watch out - even if it's labelled organic check exactly how much of the ingredients are!

    By the way, where did you get the info about the more insects killed per kg veg than honey? I am trying to convince my vegan colleagues to go organic, so it would be useful to show them that! Some of them eat quite a bit organic, but not when they go out (it's like not being vegan when you're out - how pointless!) etc so I never get to eat at meals, I just go for the company.

    Anyway, I don't think non-organic products are vegan, so I am very glad to find someone who agrees!

    And to all those who are saying 'but X action kills animals too' - it doesn't matter - the point of being vegan is surely to reduce harm as far as possible. So if eating organic saves a few thousand or million extra animals, why wouldn't you do it? That doesn't have any impact on something completely unrelated such as stepping on a worm accidentally!

    What you are saying is akin to saying: 'dairy kills cows so don't bother going vegetarian', or 'pesticides kill insects so there's no point being vegan' - there's no reason not to take the next step just because the future ones still cause damage too - each stage causes less and less damage so the further you go the better.

    Even if animals are still killed by tractors in the field (a good reason to grow your own or buy from small growers, or even forage!) in organic production that's the same number which would have died in non-organic production anyway, but you aren't killing all the others with chemicals *as well*.

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  • 1 decade ago

    the act of growing food on purpose for consumption kills insects, birds, reptiles, mammals and amphibians.

    Cultivation and mowing takes out birds nests and kills earthworms along with the millions of different lifeforms that live in the soil.

    Organic farmers do indeed use natural pesticides to control insects and diseases (which are also lifeforms-viruses, bacteria and fungii) as well as using beneficial animals to control pest insect populations (lots of killing going on in that scenario)

    Harvesting long term crops such as wheat, soy beans, etc will kill millions of lives per acre be it organic or conventional agriculture

    Walking kills lots of life forms, driving a car even more so. So should Vegans stay indoors and never go anywhere?

    Face it in order for you to live something has to die-that is life

    Source(s): I have been growing commercially on a small scale for the past 15 years. 8 of those years as certified organic and all of those years using deep organic methods and i still have to kill millions of tiny lives each year, though i try to avoid it.
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Organic farmers employ natural pesticides, so your not going to get away from some bugs getting killed. Plants even produce their own pesticides, For example: eggplant produces nicotine, a powerful natural pesticide.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Well if you do that and are a vegan, what else will you eat? Just bread?If you only eat bread, then youll be counted as a registered alcoholic! So I dont think you should.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It would only stand to reason that we humans should be eating and using things on this earth. That means in their natural state.

    Don't worry: there are organic cotton products as well.

    Source(s): vegan
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  • 1 decade ago

    Most vegans I know DO eat organic produce- not because of "animal suffering" but because they choose not to ingest carcinogens. The lifespan of migrant farm workers is 47 years. Due to exposure to toxins they have a tendency to die from cancer.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Last time I checked, fruits and vegetables aren't animal products. So no, it doesn't matter. They are vegan either way.

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  • 1 decade ago

    You can't live your life thinking like that. There are millions of tiny insects killed every time a farmer ploughs his field. Every time you walk down a footpath you tread on millions of tiny beings. How do you avoid that, you can't can you!

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  • 4 years ago

    You learn something everyday. Thanks Blaze

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