evelynmfaulkner asked in PetsDogs · 1 decade ago

Pregnant Pit Bull Symptoms and Readiness for birth?

Our family was given a Pit Bull puppy when she was 11 months old. She is a WONDERFUL dog and very good with my children (ages 2, 11/ 17). I haven't ever owned a dog before and I began to question my husband (a prior to our marriage dog owner) why her mammary glands were getting larger and expanding. He told me that since she was a larger breed of dog, that her mammary glands would be larger so I didn't think anymore about it until I saw the weight gain (belly size only) and am able to feel 'movement' in her abdominal region. We are pretty sure she is pregnant (tired a lot, sleeps a lot, growing belly, urinates a lot) and if she is, she was given to us that way (which really miffs me that the prior owners weren't honest and didn't tell us of her condition). We didn't intend on her ever having puppies however we will deal with the ones we have and then insure it doesn't happen again. My question is, how do I know when she is close to having her puppies? I am looking for answers and information~NOT derogatory statements of how mean, awful, aggressive (or anything other negative word) a Pit Bull is~ANY dog can be that way; simply depends on the owner(s). If anyone can help with some info or point me in the direction of a good informational web site, I would so much appreciate it. Thanks :-D

Update:

Thanks for all the answers!

For those that have asked, I received the dog Oct 12, 2008 and was told her birthday is Nov 16, 2008. I was given shot records and medical records with the dog and have not had her to a vet yet as we just started seeing changes as of yesterday and the vet we have chosen for her was not in the office today to be able to obtain an appt., so for the rude comment about the fact of me not taking her to a vet 'miffing' her, hopefully this helps to answer your concerns in particular. Up until yesterday evening as her shots and vet visits were up to date, I did not feel I had a reason to go to a vet as of yet. And I also plan to spay/neuter Lady as soon as she weans the puppies as I don't want to add to the amount pets that end up uncared for or up for adoption or euthanized, etc. We as a family only wanted one dog to love and welcome into our home however I cannot bear to have anything happen to her or her babies and want to make sure I do the right thing.

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    My first suggestion is to get her vet checked to be sure it is a pregnancy and not a pseudo-pregnancy. Ask about ultra sounds or x-rays to count puppies so you know how many to expect. How long have you had her? Dogs are in whelp (pregnant) for ~63 days. For the last week or so before she is due, you should take her temp 2 times a day. When it falls below 98 degrees, you can usually expect puppies in 12-24 hours. DO not let her whelp alone. She and the puppies can die if there's an emergency and no one around. I suggest you get a good book on pregnancy and whelping for canines...I recommend "Successful Dog Breeding" by Chris Walkowicz and Bonnie Wilcox DVM. It is designed to help people become responsible breeders, but since that has been denied you, you can still use the chapters on pregnancy and whelping, and it is easy to read and comprehend.

    Whatever pups she might have need you to assure they are placed in RESPONSIBLE homes. Checking out people who want your pups and making a contract that says you get them back should they ever not want them anymore is important for keeping them from dying in the shelter, or more horrible ways. Include that the new owners of your pups MUST spay/neuter them when the right age.

    ADDED: Yep, if you got her then, and she IS pregnant, she was bred before you got her for sure. You can also check your local library for books on how to whelp pups to learn more. You can never know enough, and you are stuck taking a crash course in what most responsible breeders have a few years to learn about. I am glad you take this responsibility so seriously and I feel better knowing she is in your care now. Good luck, and if you need help, there are a few of us with our e-mails open who are willing to give a hand, I'm sure.

    Source(s): Rescuer, vet tech, groomer and show exhibitor of Shetland sheepdogs for 20+ years.
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  • Becky
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    If you can feel puppies, you have anywhere from 2 wks to a day or two.

    Start taking her temperature a couple times a day (rectally). Normal for a dog is around 101-102. The temp will drop as she nears birth, and once it gets below 99, she will most likely go into labor within 12-24 hrs.

    She will begin refusing food and acting restless/nesting in early labor. As the pups move into position she will feel the need to poop frequently. You know she's getting close when you see this, so watch her carefully when she goes out. Soon you'll see visible contractions.

    Have a clean warm whelp area set up for her. Pups need a good heat source to keep them a minimum of 85 degrees for the first week or so. 95 is preferable, but make sure the mom can get away from the heat source to a more comfortable 80 degrees or so. Find your vet's phone number and an emergency vet number just in case there are complications.

    You may feel free to email me when she begins to whelp if you would like some 'online' assistance. But it would be best to have someone knowledgeable come over to walk you through it.

    Good luck!

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  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    Pregnant Pit Bull Symptoms and Readiness for birth?

    Our family was given a Pit Bull puppy when she was 11 months old. She is a WONDERFUL dog and very good with my children (ages 2, 11/ 17). I haven't ever owned a dog before and I began to question my husband (a prior to our marriage dog owner) why her mammary glands were getting larger and...

    Source(s): pregnant pit bull symptoms readiness birth: https://biturl.im/aTDS5
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  • 1 decade ago

    Start to take her temperature(rectally with a digital thermometer) 2 times a day, morning and night. When her temp drops to around 98-99 degrees, she will probably go into labor within 24 hours. She will become restless, possibly pace, start to nest(dig and scratch), and pant. These are usually the fir signs of the onset of labor. She may ask to go outside to go potty more often, but never let her go out alone, as she may "drop" a pup outdoors. You should start preparing a proper whelping box for her now, with a pig rail. (Google how to build a whelping box) You will need lots of newspapers and towels, a sterile scissors, and a baby syringe. I would also speak to your Vet for advise. Some b**chs need help, and others do not. She is pretty young, so make sure when her temp drops to stay with her all the time. Your Vet can give you more information on what to look for if complications should arise. Good luck with all, and have her spayed when the pups are weaned and in their new homes.

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  • Nancy
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    She *should* be able to take care of the pups. *should* some mothers are too young and have no idea what they're doing so she might abandon the litter. I would contact a vet, see if an emergency spay can be done. The only real concern I would have, is dog aggression. If she's not showing any of that, I doubt you'll have much concern of much else. She needs to see a vet regardless. No kill shelters probably won't take her. Pit mixes are a dime a dozen. County pound will likely put her down after trying to locate an owner and failing.

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  • 1 decade ago

    You should take your dog into the vet and have her checked. He will be able to tell you who far along she is and how many puppies you can expect. He can also give you some written information on what you can expect as her time nears. The more information you have the better it will be during labor and birth for you and your dog. You will know what to look for should problems arise and you will feel more comfortable during the delivery process. I have attached a link too which might be helpful, but please take the dog to the vet so you know how many puppies to expect when the time comes. Good luck and enjoy your pups.

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  • scelba
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    Pregnant Pitbull

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  • 4 years ago

    Hi, I understand that you are looking for some advice or resources to help fully train your dog or fix behavior problems. If a professional dog trainer is not an option at this time, or if you want to trt training your dog on your own (a great way to bond), I'd suggest you https://biturl.im/aUBYS

    A friend recommened it to me a few years ago, and I was amazed how quickly it worked, which is why I recommend it to others. The dog training academy also has as an excellent home training course.

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  • Bob
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    As you would with a human pregnancy, you need to have your dog seen by a vet -- at which time he can answer all your questions about pregnancy, birth, etc.etc. I would particularly check to see about the signs of labor, and physical arrangements you should provide during labor and delivery. Good luck!!

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  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    Curiosity, how did it all turn out? I took an abandoned pit in.... After 6 weeks... Found out she was pregnant. Due any day vet estimates. Never done this before....

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