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If a white citizen of Africa moved to the U.S., would he be an African-American?

A small but significant percentage of Africa's population consists of white settlers, especially in North African nations and in South Africa, where many Dutch settlers have lived for generations.

If you think they should not be considered African-Americans, then why not?

(Hey, it's something peripherally related . . . but not exactly. . . to get our mind off the election for a few hours!)

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  • 1 decade ago
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    No. African Americans or Black Americans are citizens or residents of the United States who have origins in any of the black populations of Africa.In the United States, the term is generally used for Americans with at least partial Sub-Saharan African ancestry. Most African Americans are the descendants of captive Africans who survived the slavery era within the boundaries of the present United States, although some are — or are descended from — voluntary immigrants from Africa, the Caribbean, Central America, South America, or elsewhere. African Americans make up the single largest racial minority in the United States,though Hispanics compose the largest ethnic minority.

    Who is African American?

    Since 1977, the United States officially categorized black people (revised to black or African American in 1997) are classified as A person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa. Other Federal offices, such as the United States Census Bureau and the adheres to the OMB standards on race in its data collection and tabulations efforts.[75] The U.S. Department of Justice Federal Bureau of Investigation also categorizes black or African-American people as "A person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa" through racial categories used in the UCR Program adopted from the Statistical Policy Handbook (1978) and published by the Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards, U.S. Department of Commerce derived from the 1977 OMB classification.

    Due in part to a centuries-old history within the United States, historical experiences pre- and post-slavery, and migrations throughout North America, the vast majority of contemporary African Americans possess varying degrees of admixture with European and Native American ancestry.

    Some courts have called a person black if the person had any known African ancestry. It became known as the one-drop rule, meaning that a single drop of "black blood" makes a person "black". Some courts have called it the traceable amount rule, and anthropologists used to call it the hypodescent rule, meaning that racially mixed persons were assigned the status of the subordinate group. Prior to the one-drop rule, different states had different laws regarding color; in Virginia, for example, a person was legally black if he or she had at least one-sixteenth black ancestry. The one-drop rule was implemented by states in the southern United States during the early to mid-1880s. For African Americans, the one-drop system of pigmentocracy was a significant factor in ethnic solidarity. African Americans generally shared a common lot in society and, therefore, common cause — regardless of their multiracial admixture or social and economic stratification.

    White citizens of African countries may be referred as Africans or European Americans. If someone agrees/disagrees, I would like some opinions about this. I am not trying to be offensive.

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  • 4 years ago

    Well, he's from Africa and residing in America now, so technically he IS African American. Personally I believe it is foolish to make use of the phrases "African American", "Caucasian" and many others. for races. I do not believe there must be any locations related to the races, on the grounds that there are white Africans, black individuals who've certainly not even been to Africa (plus, what might you name a black individual from Europe? Hardly African American?), yellow Caucasians, white individuals who've certainly not been to the Caucasian discipline and many others. In my opinion, races must be referred to as by way of their colour and location names must be reserved for describing in which any person comes from (as in in which they themselves had been born, grew up or reside now, no longer who their ancestors a couple of hundred years again had been).

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Would he be a African American YES

    Would the blacks here in America accept him as an African American NO

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Well...if their parent were from Africa, then technically they would. But if they just immigrated, they'd be just called Africans.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I think they would be considered Dutch Americans. Or maybe Boer Americans?

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  • Great question...I guess you'd have to pass it by the ones of 'color' first to see if they'd share that description. Sounds racist, but I don't mean it in a hateful way.

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  • 1 decade ago

    No they wouldn't, because African-American means something different. It's a racial designation, not a continental one.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Yes, but i dont think non-americans are allowed to move to america to live anymore. its not allowed

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