Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Education & ReferenceSpecial Education · 1 decade ago

what is asperger's syndrome?

what is asperger's syndrome?

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  • Daisy
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    Asperger syndrome (also called Asperger's syndrome, Asperger's disorder, Asperger's or AS) is the autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in which there is no general delay in language or cognitive development. Like the more severe ASDs, it is characterized by difficulties in social interaction and restricted, stereotyped patterns of behavior and interests. Although not mentioned in standard diagnostic criteria for AS, under-developed motor skills and atypical use of language are frequently reported.[1][2]

    Asperger syndrome is named after Austrian pediatrician Hans Asperger who, in 1944, described children in his practice who lacked nonverbal communication skills, demonstrated limited empathy with their peers, and had under-developed motor skills.[3] Fifty years later, AS was standardized as a diagnosis, but questions about many aspects of AS remain.[4] For example, there is lingering doubt about the distinction between AS and high-functioning autism (HFA);[5] partly due to this, the prevalence of AS is not firmly established. The exact cause of AS is unknown, although research supports the likelihood of a genetic basis; brain imaging techniques have not identified a clear common pathology.[1]

    There is no single treatment for Asperger syndrome, and the effectiveness of particular interventions is supported by only limited data. Intervention is aimed at improving symptoms and function. The mainstay of management is behavioral therapy, focusing on specific deficits to address poor communication skills, obsessive or repetitive routines, and under-developed motor skills. Most individuals with AS can learn to cope with their differences, but may continue to need moral support and encouragement to maintain an independent life.[6] Researchers and people with AS have advocated a shift in attitudes toward the view that AS is a difference, rather than a disability that must be treated or cured.

  • 6 years ago

    Well, I doubt any are born with it. I suspect that what actually happens is that Introverted, yet gifted, children are teased and tormented by their fellow students in school. Those other students may indeed be motivated by sheer envy!

    Such introverted, yet gifted, students react by exhibiting certain emotional and behavioral problems that are labeled (gasp) Asperger. Of course, adding insult to injury, there is the Extreme Male Brain canard! This is designed, of course, to cause women with Radical Feminists leanings to assume that their negative stereotypes of men are especially and unusually true of those sad, traumatized Introverts, who, are called Aspies in this society.

    • Ran4 years agoReport

      Twin Ruler and David, I don't think you two have a clue what you are talking about. I have a grandson Asperger's and he had the symptoms way before he started school or had any real contact with people. Read Doomkitty's post.

  • aamot
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    Whats Aspergers

  • 1 decade ago

    This is not a googled answer! Aspergers (pronounced hard g not j) is part of the Autistic Spectrum but not as severe as some people with autism. Aspergers children can fit in to a certain degree with mainstream children but will not get facial expression, sad, happy etc, - probably wont interact too well with their peers and stay on the periphery of everything - will not get any kind of comparative language ie raining cats and dogs - they will think actual cats and dogs are falling. May react badly to any change in routine or a new teacher. Will not like physical contact ie an arm around the shoulder if they are having a bad day. There are many other variations but you get the picture.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Other answers are good but people have a bit of a limited view of the disorder. My 14 year old brother has it, he was to live in a place for young people with aspergers syndrome at the moment cos he used to get really upset and kinda violent sometimes when he didn't get his way or was confused. He shows plenty of emotions but has a hard time dealing with them, he might not be sad when he should or gets angry when he shouldn't. he gets basic emotions like happy, sad, angry but he doesn't notice much else unless you tell him.

    He definitely does have imagination but its limited in a way, he doesn't make things up, he just copies, characters from movies or stories ect..

    unfortunately he can lie and quite well. One thing that defines him is the little "obsessions" he gets that are quite common for those with aspergers. At the moment he's into horror movies, he loves collecting them and having all the dvds in a series lines up in the dvd rack, he can also tell me the year all these movies came out in, the director and leading actors.

    He's not very good with social situations but its kinda sad cos he really wants to make friends and talk to people, he just can't tell when he's annoying them or there laughing at him and he'll do anything to get people to like him.

    Source(s): living with my brother, my mothers a special needs teacher who specialises in autism.
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    There are two major types of autism, of which you have probably heard. They are autism and Asperger’s syndrome. First let’s look at classical autism, how would we recognise it? Well, autism was first recognised in the mid 1940’s by a psychiatrist called Leo Kanner. He described a group of children, whom he was treating, who presented with some very unusual symptoms such as; - atypical social development, irregular development of communication and language, and recurring / repetitive and obsessional behaviour with aversion to novelty and refusal to accept change. His first thoughts were that they were suffering some sort of childhood psychiatric disorder.

    At around the same time that Kanner was grappling with the problems of these children, a German scientist, Hans Asperger was caring for a group of children whose behaviour also seemed irregular. Asperger suggested that these children were suffering from what he termed ‘autistic psychopathy.’ These children experienced remarkably similar symptoms to the children described by Kanner, with a single exception. – Their language development was normal! There is still an ongoing debate as to whether autism and Asperger’s syndrome are separable conditions, or whether Asperger’s syndrome is merely a mild form of autism

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Asperger syndrome (also called Asperger's syndrome, Asperger's disorder, Asperger's or AS) is the autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in which there is no general delay in language or cognitive development. Like the more severe ASDs, it is characterized by difficulties in social interaction and restricted, stereotyped patterns of behavior and interests. Although not mentioned in standard diagnostic criteria for AS, under-developed motor skills and atypical use of language are frequently reported.

    Asperger syndrome is named after Austrian pediatrician Hans Asperger who, in 1944, described children in his practice who lacked nonverbal communication skills, demonstrated limited empathy with their peers, and had under-developed motor skills.[3] Fifty years later, AS was standardized as a diagnosis, but questions about many aspects of AS remain.[4] For example, there is lingering doubt about the distinction between AS and high-functioning autism (HFA);[5] partly due to this, the prevalence of AS is not firmly established. The exact cause of AS is unknown, although research supports the likelihood of a genetic basis; brain imaging techniques have not identified a clear common pathology.

    There is no single treatment for Asperger syndrome, and the effectiveness of particular interventions is supported by only limited data. Intervention is aimed at improving symptoms and function. The mainstay of management is behavioral therapy, focusing on specific deficits to address poor communication skills, obsessive or repetitive routines, and under-developed motor skills. Most individuals with AS can learn to cope with their differences, but may continue to need moral support and encouragement to maintain an independent life.[6] Researchers and people with AS have advocated a shift in attitudes toward the view that AS is a difference, rather than a disability that must be treated or cured.

    (wikipedia)

  • 1 decade ago

    A form of Autism which is a high functioning variety. people are usually of high intelligence in a specific area, usually engineering or science. We usually have obessions and can waffle a bit on area,s like the simpsons or science. As you can tell i've being diagnosed with it. go to NAS.co.uk/aspergers for more info.

  • 4 years ago

    Think out of the box when it comes to dates. Do things that are unexpected and fun. You want her to feel like when she’s with you anything is possible. Learn here https://tr.im/J3OGy

    She’s been on plenty of dinner-and-a-movie dates. Do a little research and find interesting places and things to do around town that’s out of the ordinary. There are hidden gems in every city. Also, get to know the owners of small restaurants and business. When your date is known by the people in the establishment, it feels more like you’re being invited into his inner circle. Just be aware that there’s a fine line between being impressive and showing off. Make sure that you make your date feel like you’re inviting her in and sharing instead of being a douche. It all goes back to intentions.

  • 1 decade ago

    Its a social communication disorder along the autistic spectrum.

    http://www.asplanet.info

    click onto as symptoms

    Try the AS test, I score a 42

    Many answerers point out that there aren't speech delays associated with asperger's. It is true that the DSM hasn't been updated yet, its a work in progress and only included asperger's in 1994 at all.

    Many children with speech delays are given an asperger dx. My middle son dx PDD.NOS at 9 months has begun looking aspie despite a speech delay since 12 months. At 18 months the neurologist is on board that he is looking very aspie. He received the aspie dx. by 1 neurologist before age 3 despite moderate to severe speech language delays.

    I was dx aspie at age 7, same when I was dx dyslexic. My father was dx with autistic features at age 3 when he began hyperlexia. He received the asperger dx when my brother was dx ADD. My other brother dx PDD.NOS is more HFA. There is overlap in disorders on the spectrum.

    Those that are on the spectrum recognize others that are on the spectrum very easily, also if you are on the spectrum its not so confusing to tell where somebody is on the spectrum. Asperger's are much different than those with HFA, and PDD.NOS or autistic features are different still.

    Aspie's generally have a lot more anxiety,above ave. cognitive abilities to gifted, and try very hard to mix with typicals, but stand out. Have odd speech, are literal, use awkward word choices, are very poor conversationalists. Yes we talk but back and forth chit chat is next to impossible its usually like reading an instruction manual.

    HFA aren't so concerned with friends and peers, are less anxious, and have ave to above ave cognitive abilities. They don't try so hard to pass for typical, and aren't picked on quite so much. They don't try to engage, so don't seem as odd. They are more eccentric in general. My brother only ate white food for about 5 years. Yes, in color, yogurt, milk, cauliflower, potato, scallops etc. He also didn't date at all for about 10 years since he graduated from college even though he has a good job, and is attractive.

    Very funny to me that so many neurotypical answers here are very autistic looking with the whole history of Kanner, and Hans Asperger and the DSM. There is no feeling or emotion attached to it, just listing the facts. Those on the spectrum have a blunted affect at best my brother is usually flat. Temple Grandin describes this in her books.

    I wouldn't say its not a big deal, its difficult with the misunderstandings, I have been fired more than half a dozen times despite being very proficient at my job, its just getting along with co-workers. It is a lot of work to force myself to look at who is talking, and I am constantly saying to myself smile, don't interrupt, keep looking, don't walk away etc.

    Source(s): I have asperger's
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