Why do you think adoption records are sealed?

I've been doing some reading lately and came across a paper outlining the reasons why adoption records are sealed. It states that they were originally sealed, at least in many states in the US, to prevent the public from accessing the information and potentially blackmailing the adoptee or their birth parents over... show more I've been doing some reading lately and came across a paper outlining the reasons why adoption records are sealed. It states that they were originally sealed, at least in many states in the US, to prevent the public from accessing the information and potentially blackmailing the adoptee or their birth parents over the adoption. Keeping in mind that at those times adoption was not something that was talked about "in polite company".

It also states that "Sealing court and adoption agency records was never designed to exclude members of the adoption triad from examining their adoption records."

If that is the case, how did things get to where they are today?
Update: ++++++++++++++++

In case anyone is wondering, the article I am referring to is called "Sealed Adoption Records in Historical Perspective" and was written by Dr E. Wayne Carp, PhD. It was published in Adoption Quarterly, Vol. 5(2), 2001.
Update 2: Actually Theresa, my reading indicates something totally different. "Originally, the amended birth certificate, whereby the adopted child is issued a second birth certificate and the original one is sealed, was first publicly proposed in a paper delivered at the American Public Health Association annual... show more Actually Theresa, my reading indicates something totally different. "Originally, the amended birth certificate, whereby the adopted child is issued a second birth certificate and the original one is sealed, was first publicly proposed in a paper delivered
at the American Public Health Association annual meeting in 1930 by Sheldon L. Howard, Illinois State Registrar of Vital Statistics, and Henry B. Hemenway, Medical Registrar at the Vital Statistics Division of
the Illinois Department of Public Health. Their stated purposes were to increase the statistical accuracy of birth records and to promote the welfare of illegitimate and adopted children. By 1948, nearly every state had enacted into law Howard and Hemenway’s proposal. But there is no evidence that child welfare officials ever intended this to prevent adopted children from gaining access to their original one.

Wegar, K. (1997). Adoption, identity and kinship: The debate over sealed birth records.
New Haven: Yale Uni Press
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