Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsWeather · 1 decade ago

how is a convection storm different from a normal storm?

IN APPEARANCE

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Convective storms are those that are generated by the heating of the earth and with deep moisture. The three key ingredients for a convective storm are, Lift, Moisture and Instability.

    Convective storms are those that produce, Hail, Strong Winds Heavy Rains and in some cases Tornados.

    Typical Convective storms are of the cumulonimbus types of clouds and are identified by visual clues in the field by spotters and other trained personnel.

    A Convective storm system is usually composed of a cluster of ordinary convective cells at various stages of their life cycle.

    New cells within the convective system are generated primarily by either low-level convergence along a preexisting boundary, or by lifting at the leading edge of the system-scale cold pool that was produced by the previous cells. A multicell storm may have a lifetime of several hours, and may also have supercells incorporated as a part of the system as well.

    Source(s): I am a Skywarn Spotter for the National Weather Service and am called upon to identify these types of storms during Severe Weather Other resources are the Glossary of Meteorology http://amsglossary.allenpress.com/glossary Meteorology Education & Training website http://www.meted.ucar.edu/ Advanced Spotters Guide http://www.meted.ucar.edu/
  • buncie
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    Define Convective

  • 1 decade ago

    I am glad you got a full answer from out friend Freight_Train because for me:

    A convection is anything where the air rises.

    A subsidence is anything where the air is sinks, and

    An advection is anything where the air flows parallel to the earth.

    Furthermore, a storm is the definition of a wind of Beaufort force 10.

    Hence, a convection storm would be difficult for me to differentiate from a "normal storm." I am glad some people know more than me! :-)

  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    how is a convection storm different from a normal storm?

    IN APPEARANCE

    Source(s): convection storm normal storm: https://tr.im/2ddii
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  • Bonnie
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

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    A hurricane is a severe tropical storm that forms in the North Atlantic Ocean, the Northeast Pacific Ocean east of the dateline, or the South Pacific Ocean east of 160E. Hurricanes need warm tropical oceans, moisture and light winds above them. If the right conditions last long enough, a hurricane can produce violent winds, incredible waves, torrential rains and floods. In other regions of the world, these types of storms have different names. Typhoon — (the Northwest Pacific Ocean west of the dateline) Severe Tropical Cyclone — (the Southwest Pacific Ocean west of 160E or Southeast Indian Ocean east of 90E) Severe Cyclonic Storm — (the North Indian Ocean) Tropical Cyclone — (the Southwest Indian Ocean) Hurricanes rotate in a counterclockwise direction around an "eye." A tropical storm becomes a hurricane when winds reach 74 mph. There are on average six Atlantic hurricanes each year; over a three-year period, approximately five hurricanes strike the United States coastline from Texas to Maine. The Atlantic hurricane season begins June 1 and ends November 30. The East Pacific hurricane season runs from May 15 through November 30, with peak activity occurring during July through September. In a normal season, the East Pacific would expect 15 or 16 tropical storms. Nine of these would become hurricanes, of which four or five would be major hurricanes. When hurricanes move onto land, the heavy rain, strong winds and heavy waves can damage buildings, trees and cars. The heavy waves are called a storm surge. Storm surge is very dangerous and a major reason why you MUST stay away from the ocean during a hurricane. The terms "hurricane" and "typhoon" are regionally specific names for a strong "tropical cyclone". A tropical cyclone is the generic term for a non-frontal synoptic scale low-pressure system over tropical or sub-tropical waters with organized convection (i.e. thunderstorm activity) and definite cyclonic surface wind circulation (Holland 1993). Tropical cyclones with maximum sustained surface winds of less than 17 m/s (34 kt, 39 mph) are called "tropical depressions" (This is not to be confused with the condition mid-latitude people get during a long, cold and grey winter wishing they could be closer to the equator ;-)). Once the tropical cyclone reaches winds of at least 17 m/s (34 kt, 39 mph) they are typically called a "tropical storm" and assigned a name. If winds reach 33 m/s (64 kt, 74 mph)), then they are called: "hurricane" (the North Atlantic Ocean, the Northeast Pacific Ocean east of the dateline, or the South Pacific Ocean east of 160E) "typhoon" (the Northwest Pacific Ocean west of the dateline) "severe tropical cyclone" (the Southwest Pacific Ocean west of 160E or Southeast Indian Ocean east of 90E) "severe cyclonic storm" (the North Indian Ocean) "tropical cyclone" (the Southwest Indian Ocean) hope it helps.

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