A question from Richard Dawkins?

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vu7NEnw1B8g

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A questioner asks Richard Dawkins "is anger a common symptom of a person who is going through the deconditioning process of their parent's religion"

Dawkins- "I don't know, it had never occurred to me".

He then asks the audience if anyone else had personal experiences. People in the audience answer yes and some state their anger is directed towards those authority figures who pushed their religion onto them as vulnerable children.

Do former theists that are now atheists confirm this claim?

18 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Yes, I can confirm that, I am angry that I went to a school that made a big deal out of telling lies to me about bible god.

    That is why I come here to argue about religion

    Can you imagine a Christian being that fair during a debate?

  • 1 decade ago

    I'm not sure if it's common or normal but when I went through the 'deconditioning' process I was only angry at my parents for not supporting my newly found skepticism. Naturally, I'm sure they would get a bit of a surprise, but I would have liked something more than criticism.

    Also, the authority figures who push religion onto the youth does make me angry. I would prefer if those figures would give children all of the necessary materials needed to make their own decision. And of course, those who would systematically try and convert everyone can't be trusted with anything other than enjoying a crucifixion. Oh that was harsh, I really don't appreciate them though.

  • Great question. As an atheist, I was encouraged to think for myself, but, in my 20s while exploring different faith ideas, encountered a lot of grief from my father, a devout atheist.

    I think any parental efforts to direct (that's the important distinction) a child's thinking about religion/theism/atheism are subtle, and sometimes not so subtle, forms of mental and emotional abuse.

  • Jess H
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    Yes and no.

    I was taught religion mostly by my parents, who are wonderful people. They were teaching me the things that THEY were taught to believe by their parents who were taught to believe it by THEIR parents, etc. They didn't have any ill intentions.

    The anger that I feel about it is more towards society in general...that in this day and age we haven't stood up as a whole and said, "Wait a minute...WHY do we believe these things?" We really should have moved away from this superstitious nonsense by now, and I don't get why we haven't.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I am not a former theist because I never adopted my mothers religion. I do get annoyed when she pushes her beliefs on me, especially angry, hell related ones & the way she never takes responsibility or lays responsibility because everything is in GODs hands...Ugh! My father is an atheist and could support your claim.

  • 1 decade ago

    When I became an atheist, I had the impression that I had risen above the rest and the others were simply too naive to see through the scheme. So I wasn't angry or mad at anyone.

  • 1 decade ago

    All children are easy to teach. There children. Underdeveloped brains. I still question gods ways. But you have to remember. We wanted his knowledge. Now its your free will what you do with it. Good or bad. The test of your will power. You must keep your eyes and ears open and question.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I remember being angry towards the society that indoctrinated me as a child (as a month-old even). Which even got me anti-social for a few months, but that was the phase, I'm quite your happy Atheist now.

    Source(s): Former Theist
  • 1 decade ago

    Not this one. I made some of my own choices as to what form of theism I believed in when I was an adolescent, so the first person I would have to be "mad" at would be myself.

    Its better to focus on the post theistic issues, the better choice that we made as adults.

  • kimy
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    Not this one.

    I was never angry, I just stopped believing. I went to Catholic boarding school and actually enjoyed it. I was never abused in any fashion, and I got a great education.

    The only anger was on my mum's part, when I told her.

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