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So, what's up with the "Jesus Fish?"?

Did it derive from the feeding of the thousands with the fish/loaves of bread story in the Bible? Just wondering where it came from. I see it on cars sometimes.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    There was a wonderful Seinfeld episode where Elaine stole her boyfriends Jesus Fish off his car..........and they got into a fight about it.

    Yes, it was an early Christian symbol.......to signify that you were Christian, when it was a dangerous thing to say out loud around the Romans.

    Jesus was, afterall, the fisher of men,,,,,,,and his first apostles were fisherman, who dropped their nets to follow this wise teacher.

    And one of his mircles, was the Loaves of Bread and the fish.....

    (and I suppose, if they drew a wine bottle for the wine miracle.......people might get the wrong idea and think you were thirsty or something...........)

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  • 3 years ago

    What Is The Jesus Fish

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  • Dave
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    there are a few reasons why the "jesus fish" was created.

    1. Jesus called us to be fishers of men

    2. using the greek letters that spells fish in the greek was an acronym (sadly can't remember exactly what it was though)

    3. the early christians wanted a symbol they could have out that no one would really pay attention too and they could use it to tell fellow Christians that it was a safe haven to talk about Jesus there. that is also why they made up the greeting which goes "he is risen" and if the other person was a christian they would reply "he is risen indeed" and the whole secrecy stuff was because Christians were constantly being killed for their faith.

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  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    So, what's up with the "Jesus Fish?"?

    Did it derive from the feeding of the thousands with the fish/loaves of bread story in the Bible? Just wondering where it came from. I see it on cars sometimes.

    Source(s): jesus fish: https://shortly.im/Ai4w4
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  • 1 decade ago

    This is what wikipedia.com says about it.

    Ichthys as a Christian symbol

    [edit]Symbolic meaning

    An early circular ichthys symbol, created by combining the Greek letters ΙΧΘΥΣ, Ephesus.

    The use of the Ichthys symbol by early Christians appears to date from the end of the 1st century AD. Ichthus (ΙΧΘΥΣ, Greek for fish) is an acronym, a word formed from the first letters of several words. It compiles to "Jesus Christ God's Son Saviour", in ancient Greek "Ἰησοῦς Χριστός, Θεοῦ Υἱός, Σωτήρ" [Iēsous Christos Theou Yios, Sōtēr].

    Iota is the first letter of Iesous (Ἰησοῦς), Greek for Jesus.

    Chi is the first letter of Christos (Χριστóς), Greek for "anointed".

    Theta is the first letter of Theou (Θεοῦ), that means "of God", genitive case of Θεóς "God".

    Upsilon is the first letter of Huios (Υἱός), Greek for Son.

    Sigma is the first letter of Soter (Σωτήρ), Greek for Saviour.

    Historically, twentieth century use of the ichthys motif is an adaptation based on an Early Christian symbol which included a small cross for the eye or the Greek letters "ΙΧΘΥΣ". Catholic theology has elaborated on the five words of the acronym into the "Jesus prayer", or, "Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner."

    An ancient adaptation of ichthus is a wheel which contains the letters ΙΧΘΥΣ superimposed such that the result resembles an eight-spoked wheel.

    Seiyaku.com had this article

    The Christian Fish Symbol (also called 'The Jesus Fish')

    Christian fish symbol

    The Christian fish symbol is usually just two simple curved lines. Modern looking and sleek, often seen on car bumpers, it gives many people the impression that it's a new symbol. In fact, its history goes back even further than the cross as a symbol used by Christians.

    As early as the second century Titus Flavius Clemens (St. Clement of Alexandria), suggested that Christians identify themselves with a seal engraved with a fish or dove (see also Dove Cross). The fish in particular, was considered important enough to be mentioned many times in the Bible. Clemens was a Greek theologian and noted that letters of the Greek word for fish, ΙΧΘΥΣ (pronounced Ichthys), made the following neat little acrostic:

    Ι

    Iota Χ

    Chi Θ

    Theta Υ

    Upsilon Σ

    Sigma

    Iesous Christos Theou Yios * Soter

    Jesus Christ God's Son Saviour

    (* pronounced Iios -

    with emphasis on the 'o')

    At this time, the cross was not used as a Christian symbol, so the fish gave them something simple and easily recognisable, plus a motto that described their Jesus as Christ, God's Son, and Saviour. (This idea might have also been partly a protest against the Pagan emperors of the time, who named themselves Theou Yios: God's sons).

    The lowercase Greek character for Alpha (α) is similar to the fish symbol. This may also have had some influence on the decision for Christians to adopt the symbol, since Jesus calls himself "the Alpha and the Omega"1 – the beginning and the end. (See also Alpha and Omega Cross.)

    In the fourth century, the cross became a more popular symbol for Christians, and the symbolism of the fish gradually disappeared.

    In recent years, some Christian groups have attempted to give their religion a fresh new look by reviving the fish as an alternative symbol. Some argue that this is a healthy 'downgrading' of the cross, which is simply a symbol of Christ's crucifixion and resurrection. The cross, they say, should not be treated as a god (being mindful not to revere the fish symbol2). Other groups prefer the cross, because the fish symbol doesn't reflect Christ's sacrifice. Fortunately for Christians, they can make their own choices. (See also Jesus Fish Cross and Fish Hook Cross.)

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  • 1 decade ago

    fish in Greek is spelled icthus

    in Greek words-an anagram meaning Jesus Christ, Son of God, Saviour

    after the death of Christ, Christians were persecuted

    e.g. (for example) AD 55 Nero blamed them for burning Rome

    AD 70 Rome obliterates Israel

    so a secret sign - if you did not know the person you were speaking to was a Christian

    you would draw the top half of the fish in the dirt - looks like the top of a circle

    if the person completed the fish - then you knew you were safe

    blessings

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  • 1 decade ago

    Jesus' Disciples were fishermen who left their jobs to follow Jesus. when Jesus was hung on the Cross it was a sign that meant horrible things to the people of the times. so the sign of the fish was used so that one Christian could make himself known to another Christian. later on at some point during history the sign of the Cross was used for the recognistion for other Christians. now you will see both signs used to show that someone is a Christian.

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  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    yes. jesus is a fish. all the jesus are called fish . we are loved by the fish jesus.

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  • 1 decade ago

    the fish was a symbol of christianity during a time when we were persacuted and needed to display who we were without people knowing. so christians developed the fish as a symbol for the cross. now its kinda popular randomly.

    Source(s): im a christian and in global studies.
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Ichthus (ΙΧΘΥΣ, Greek for fish) is an acronym, a word formed from the first letters of several words. It compiles to "Jesus Christ God's Son Saviour", in ancient Greek "Ἰησοῦς Χριστός, Θεοῦ Υἱός, Σωτήρ" [Iēsous Christos Theou Yios, Sōtēr].

    Source(s): My favorite color was blue, now I like macaroni
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