Trell773 asked in Science & MathematicsBiology · 1 decade ago

What kind of Spider is that?

& is it poisonous? becouse it is too big to be a harmless spider to me atleast? I was going to kill it because it lives behind the garage where my dogs go & I know one will try to play with it.

http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b253/kiati17/DSC...

http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b253/kiati17/DSC...

http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b253/kiati17/DSC...

http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b253/kiati17/DSC...

Update:

Thanks I think I might spray it with some bug spray until it dies because I never seen a spider that big in illinois!

417 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    I'm pretty sure that's an orb weaver. If it is your dog is fine.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Spider Pig

  • pitt
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    Are Corn Spiders Poisonous

  • John D
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    Great pictures. That looks like a yellow garden spider. An orb weaver.

    Argiope aurantia, is marked with yellow, black, orange or silver. The female body is more than 1 inch long with much longer legs. It is also known as the black and yellow garden spider and sometimes the writing spider because of a thickened interwoven section in the web’s center.

    Orbweavers are generally harmless but can be a nuisance when they build large webs in places inconvenient for humans.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    "The Black and Yellow Argiope is a common orb web spider. Orb web means it spins a web like a circle.

    Female spiders are much larger than males, growing almost an inch and a half long. Males grow about 3/4 inch long. Both spiders have a cephalothorax (small front body section) with silver hairs on it. The abdomen (large back section) is egg-shaped with black and yellow coloring.

    Legs of these spiders are black with red or yellow bands. Each leg has three claws on the end.

    Black and Yellow Argiopes live in fields and gardens. They can be found on shrubs, tall plants, and flowers.

    The web of this spider spirals out from the center and can be two feet across. The female builds the large web, and a male will build a smaller web on the outer part of her web. The male's web is a thick zig-zag of white silk."

    Source(s): some web site on the net .. do a google search for black and yellow spider you will find this one.
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    IT has a lot of names....a lot already names by others. One other name I know it as is a 'Banana Spider'. I'm guessing because of its markings. They are common, especially this time of year.

    Maybe you could relocate it? He found a spot that he thought was good for 'grocery shopping'. He just wants to eat and survive.

    Just get a long stick and get him to grab onto it and walk him over to some other location and let him go. He will find another place to build and he won't hurt anyone.

    Just about any spider or animal will bite of messed with in a rough or aggressive way. I don't think they are poisonous. Never heard of anyone ever being bitten, let alone die from a bite. I imagine it would not feel too god to be bitten tho.

    Hope you can move it to another place. I don't like spiders either, but I try and do my best to have everyone live in harmony......yanno?

  • It looks a wee bit like a black widow spider.

    Apparently the collor of the distinct pattern on the bottom can change. I've seen them with white hour glass shaped patches on the bottom, too, in Florida.

    The trick is not to be killed by that sort of thing, rather than to write Yahoo.

    So Squish it, squish it now. And run away if there are more than a few.

    And then get help.

    Cause they don't call these black widows for nothing. They kill people.

    Mom once went into the Laundry room after a hatching. Thousands of these black bad boys (sic) were everywhere. Dad took her in one arm when he walked in, brushed me out the door and just ran.

    And I thought dad wasn't afeared of anything...

  • 1 decade ago

    It looks like a typical garden spider (argiope) to me and he's harmless, unless you're a bug, in which case you better run (or fly) like heck. I also doubt your dog will play with it. If its anything like my dog, it will just attack it. The spider should be the one that's scared in this case.

    LOL on the "never seen a spider that big in Illinois". Come out here to Kansas, last week my 4 yr old son came screaming and shaking about the huge spider he saw. His dad thought he was F.O.S. for about a minute, til' he came screaming back too. That thing was bigger than some of the tarantulas I've seen at the pet store, haha. It was one of the biggest wolf spiders I've seen. I've seen them as big as the palm of my hand around here. NOT FUNNY. Then when you work up the courage to smash them ( I never can, that's why theres such a thing as marriage - someone has to be the bug killer and that someone is not me.) their legs run off in different directions, it's disgusting. I've been told several times that wolf spiders aren't aggressive and won't USUALLY bite. But I've also been told when they do it hurts like heck.

    As far as any spider goes, if it's outside, I leave it alone, if they come inside, well that's when I go get the bug killer, aka my husband to get rid of it.

    P.S. - some people might say that spider is a good omen, a sign of good things to come. There are alot of superstitions about spiders you can check out on

    http://www.spiderzrule.com/superstions.htm

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Hey, I was just on the internet today researching that spider and I believe it is The spider species Argiope aurantia is commonly known as the Black and Yellow Garden Spider, Writing Spider or Corn Spider . It is common to the lower 48 of the United States, southern Canada, Mexico, and Central America. They have distinctive yellow and black markings on their abdomens and a mostly white cephalothorax. Males range from 5 to 9 mm; females from 19 to 28 mm. Like other members of Argiope and almost all other spider species, they are considered harmless to humans.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The genus Argiope includes rather large and spectacular spiders that have often a strikingly coloured abdomen. These are well distributed throughout the world, and most countries in temperate or warmer climates have one or more species, which look similar.Argiope aurantia is commonly known as the "black and yellow garden spider", or "writing spider," after the mistaken idea web stabilimenta were correspondence. Like almost all other spiders, Argiope are harmless to humans.

  • 1 decade ago

    That is a Black and Yellow Garden Spider, writing spider or also called corn spider. The spider species Argiope aurantia is commonly known as the Black and Yellow Garden Spider, Writing Spider or Corn Spider . It is common to the lower 48 of the United States, southern Canada, Mexico, and Central America. They have distinctive yellow and black markings on their abdomens and a mostly white cephalothorax. Males range from 5 to 9 mm; females from 19 to 28 mm. Like other members of Argiope and almost all other spider species, they are considered harmless to humans This female of the species is striking in appearance with distinct yellow and black markings, including banding on the legs. Despite the vivid color, the garden spider is well camouflaged, blending in easily with partially sunlit areas. The female of the species grows much larger than the male. Females have large rounded bodies that may grow to 40 mm (1 1/2 inches), excluding the legs. If the length of the legs is added, the female can reach 75 mm (3") in diameter. Males are thin-bodied and only 20 mm (¾") long.

    A. aurantia has three claws on each foot, unlike spiders that have only two claws and do not spin orb-webs. The third claw helps them manage the strands of silk while they spin the complicated web.

    The young of the species resemble the adults, except for size and the development of reproductive organs. These spiders are not dangerous to people, and their bites result in nothing more than a sore, itchy swelling that goes away in a few days. The medical literature contains at least one report of a bite by A. aurantia (Gorham and Rheney 1968). Extreme pain some distance from the site of the bite was suggestive of a neurotoxin Garden Spiders often build webs in areas adjacent to open sunny fields where they stay concealed and protected from the wind. The spider can also be found along the eaves of houses and outbuildings or in any tall vegetation where they can securely stretch a web. The circular part of the female's web may reach two feet in diameter. Webs are built at elevations from two to eight feet off the ground.

    Female Argiope Aurantia spiders tend to be somewhat local, often staying in one place throughout much of their lifetime.

    Like almost all other spiders, Argiope are harmless to humans. Like most garden spiders they eat insects, and they are capable of consuming prey up to twice their size. A. savigny was even reported to occasionally feed on the small bat Rhynchonycteris naso[3]. They might bite if grabbed, but other than for defense they have no interest in biting humans. Their venom is not regarded as a serious medical problem for humans, although they often contain a library of polyamine toxins with potential as therapeutic medicinal agents.[4] Among these, the notable Argiotoxin ArgTX-636 (A. lobata).

    Don't worry they can't hurt you or your dogs.

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