Can you fly VFR at 3000 feet?

I know that over 3000 you do the NE odd SW even plus 500. Can you fly at 3000 AND below and be legal vfr, or would the 3000 be reserved for IFR?

7 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    If you are referring to FAA regs, then 3000 ft in class G or E airspace is VFR or uncontrolled if above VFR minimums until 17,999 feet.

    If you are referring to the VFR cruise altitudes above 3000 feet then the aircraft must be flown 0-179 ODD+500 180-359 EVEN+500. It can be defined as VFR cursing altitudes which are recommended when above 3000.

    Therefore you can fly at 3000 feet which doesn't require the rule, but watch out more carefully because you might not be the only one trying the same thing you are doing.

    VFR Cruising Altitudes and Flight Levels

    If your magnetic course

    (ground track) is:

    And you are more than 3,000 feet above the surface but below 18,000 feet MSL, fly:

    And you are above 18,000 feet MSL to FL 290, fly:

    0° to 179°

    Odd thousands MSL, plus 500 feet

    (3,500; 5,500; 7,500, etc.)

    Odd Flight Levels plus 500 feet

    (FL 195; FL 215; FL 235, etc.)

    180° to 359°

    Even thousands MSL, plus 500 feet

    (4,500; 6,500; 8,500, etc.)

    Even Flight Levels plus 500 feet

    (FL 185; FL 205; FL 225, etc.)

  • 4 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    Can you fly VFR at 3000 feet?

    I know that over 3000 you do the NE odd SW even plus 500. Can you fly at 3000 AND below and be legal vfr, or would the 3000 be reserved for IFR?

    Source(s): fly vfr 3000 feet: https://tr.im/x2YJZ
  • 3 years ago

    Vfr Altitudes

  • 3 years ago

    Vfr Cruising Altitudes

  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • Jason
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    Mxsmanic is correct. The odds/evens rule of VFR flight does not begin until you are flying more than 3000' AGL. Thus, unless you are flying over death valley, you are not LEGALLY REQUIRED to comply. However it is probably still a good idea, as many pilots will do so simply because they do not know the 3000' AGL rule.

  • 1 decade ago

    Hell yes. While it's a courtesy to use these cruising altitudes, and assuming you're over sea level, which is unlikely, it's not required. You're just being kind of a jerk.

    You can fly below it all you want, as long as you don't bust the altitude minimums, which vary on how populated the area beneath it is. Out in the middle of nowhere, you can fly as low as you want as long as you're 500 ft. from any person, vehicle, structure, etc.

    However, the FAA always says you must be at an altitude where you can safely land the airplane if a power unit were to fail, which, in some areas, might be different.

    Source(s): Pilot.
  • 1 decade ago

    In the U.S., it's 3000 feet AGL, not 3000 feet MSL. If you're less than 3000 feet above the ground and VFR, altitude is (almost) at your discretion. If you are exactly 3000 feet above the ground or more, your actual altitude AGL depends on your altitude MSL. If terrain is at 2700 feet MSL, you can fly at 4500 feet MSL in any direction, but if the terrain is at 500 feet MSL, you can only fly at 4500 feet if you are VFR and westbound (180-359).

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.