Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureReligion & Spirituality · 1 decade ago

Is it true? Dukes University tested 100 patients on the power of prayer?

And they concluded truth, the 50 prayed on all recovered to different extents whilst the other 50 some even died?

I heard it from some christian who heard it from a pastor. But i research on it myself and it's actually a very popular story if you type 'duke university study prayer' on google, only it was a study on 748 patients and the results turned in no correlation between prayer and healing. So is this guy or that pastor just lying or does someone actually know which study they were talking about?

When i confronted the guy about this he said it was a different study, plus he also said that the media are lying about the truth, which i think is RIDICULOUS. When I explain to him how ridiculous that is i think his next excuse would be something like 'don't test god'.

(report whores get out)

Update:

Wow, Paul Cryp, wow. So we can't test them, didn't I say that will be the next christians argument after an attempt to support their delusion fails? Also btw we aren't testing the entities themselves but their effects which are supposed to prove God, like Elijah did. But nice try now run back into your corner of absolute lack of evidence.

Update 2:

Excuse after excuse. That's what losers do.

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    Yes, the version you read about when you googled it is the true version.

    Christians, especially hardcore ones like pastors, tend to very directly lie about research like that in order to dupe their flock. It's sad that they are willing to do this.

    Source(s): The Atheati are watching you.
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  • 1 decade ago

    I'm not sure the name of the study, but I did recently read about a study in which it was proved the there was no correlation between praying and getting what you prayed for. A few of the people praying did get what they asked for, but this was put down to coincidence and the placebo effect.

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  • 1 decade ago

    There have been numerous such ludicrous studies, some even involving praying for one group of planted seeds and not another. They loverlook two important factors. First, prayer itself has no power. Prayer is simply communication with the One Who is all powerful. And second, spiritual entities lie outside the purview of science, and are not subject to scientific testing.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Some things to ponder:

    What was the diagnosis of those patients?

    What were the prayers that were being prayed?

    Not every prayer that one puts forth is for healing. Sometimes it is to put an end to the suffering that is going on. Sometimes it is to have the person die a quiet, peaceful death. Yes, we do like to pray for healing, but it is up to God as to what that healing will be.

    When my mother had her hip surgery... we prayed for quick healing and comfortable rehab. And she did. Was she in pain? Yes, but the docs were amazed that they were able to stop pain meds so early. And she was released from rehab early.

    When my grandfather was dying of pancreatic cancer, did we ask for him to be healed? No, we asked for peace for all of us and for him to die peacefully and painlessly. And he did... he died in his bed, after telling his wife he loved her and that he was just so tired. He took a deep breath and that was it.

    Yes, scientific studies are good for some things. And I do give them a lot of credence. But for matters of faith, sorry, it just doesn't matter what they say.....

    Source(s): LCMS Lutheran, who has to remind herself... God's will, not my will
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  • Renata
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    My problem with this kind of "experiment" is - what about the patients, family members, and others who were also praying, but asking for a different outcome. One person might be praying for the sick person to be healed, some one else might think it best to pray for a painless end of their life. (Or might even think that its best for the person to suffer, to "atone" for their sins).

    How could they possibly take all that into consideration?

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  • Jess H
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    http://www.nytimes.com/2006/03/31/health/31pray.ht...

    Not only *didn't* prayer help, but they actually found that those prayed for had more post-operative complications.

    Now you ask that he show YOU where he got his information that "they concluded that the 50 who were prayed for all recovered while those who weren't died."

    Don't try to argue with people like this. Just laugh at them, like they deserve.

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  • 1 decade ago

    He probably heard it from someone else and never checked his sources. That happens a lot when people are grasping for anything real to justify something imaginary.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    No its not.

    http://quackfiles.blogspot.com/2005/07/prayer-wont...

    http://snurl.com/3r4ee [quackfiles_blogspot_com]

    See? (telling fibs is against God's Law.)

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
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  • 1 decade ago

    Your research is accurate, the preacher is lying.

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