Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Politics & GovernmentPolitics · 1 decade ago

EVERYONE HAS THE RIGHT TO PURSUE HAPPINESS DOESN'T MEAN YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO ACHIEVE IT.?

Agree or Disagree ? is this what the Fathers intended...or is this more Right wing revisionist BS ?

Update:

Edit :this is an answer from one of my other questions

Update 2:

Edit; Jeez Libstick..so The Bible entitles war profiteers to collect ridiculous sums of wealth while the poor die by the Millions to afford them that luxury ?

Bliss for who ? The uncaring and unthinking ?

(Iraqi Dead) http://www.justforeignpolicy.org/iraq/iraqdeaths.h...

(Americans dead and wounded) http://www.antiwar.com/casualties/

11 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    They meant pursue, not achieve like they meant white male landowners when they said are created equal

    Appealing to the original intentions of the Founding Fathers is mistaken for three reasons:

    1. The Founders were a contentious, disagreeable lot.

    2. They were often personally conflicted on the issues.

    3. Times change.

    http://www.huppi.com/kangaroo/L-intentions.htm

    However brilliant they were, the Founders do not deserve to be historically recast as secular saints. They were not gods -- they were quite fallible human beings. They owned slaves, denied women the right to vote, committed atrocities against Native Americans, and made clearly anti-Semitic statements. The government they created was not really of the people; it was of rich, white, male landowners. Although they created a Bill of Rights guaranteeing individual freedoms, this document was not seriously enforced for 130 years afterwards. For example, the press was frequently censored for "seditious" material, and it was not until the early 20th century that the Supreme Court actually heard its first case on free speech!

    http://www.huppi.com/kangaroo/L-reverence.htm

    Today's Americans do not limit themselves to 18th century medicine, 18th century science, 18th century technology or 18th century English. Why they should then limit themselves to 18th century political science and economics is therefore a challenge to conservative and libertarian thought

  • 1 decade ago

    This is a question that shouldn't even be asked if we lived in a sane world. Whenever fine ideas are touted, people always manage to screw it up, so we have to add in caveats for the dismally stupid.

    Everyone has the right to pursue happiness - as long as that happiness does not infringe on the rights of others. It's so obvious, yet some people just don't get it.

    EG:

    Just because the constitution guarantees freedom of speech, it does not mean that you can use it to make the lives of others miserable.

    The right to protect one's territorial and sovereign rights by armed force does not include the right to protect one's way of life by armed force. You cannot invade, nuke, or blockade a country to save a few cents on the price of gas or guarantee future supplies of energy. That would be theft by any definition.

    The right to pursue one's personal happiness is one of the highest ideals penned by a government. Somehow, that ideal has been twisted at the national level in America to promote greed, war, and life in ignorance. Wealth without risk, rewards without effort, and information without wisdom. - That is the kind of life reserved for animals in zoos, and cannot possibly be regarded as anything but sedentary and useless.

  • Daisy
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    Main Entry: pur·suit

    Pronunciation: \pər-ˈsüt, -ˈsyüt\

    Function: noun

    Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French pursute, from pursure

    Date: 14th century

    1 : the act of pursuing

    2 : an activity that one engages in as a vocation, profession, or avocation : occupation

    Main Entry: hap·pi·ness

    Pronunciation: \ˈha-pē-nəs\

    Function: noun

    Date: 15th century

    1obsolete : good fortune : prosperity

    2 a: a state of well-being and contentment : joy b: a pleasurable or satisfying experience

    3: felicity, aptness

    Since life and liberty are separate rights and by these definitions the pursuit of happiness is working towards a state of well being and contentment; a pleasurable or satisfying experience, means the extras. These extras are not a right only the pursuit is.

  • 1 decade ago

    You have the right to search after happiness as you see it. You are not guaranteed you will find it. Most Americans don't even know what they are looking for.

  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 1 decade ago

    The overwhelming impression I get from politicians, the media and YA is that the rich have the right to pursue and achieve happiness while the poor, working poor, labor and middle classes have the right to be ashamed of themselves for not being rich.

  • 1 decade ago

    Yes

  • 1 decade ago

    I believe it was quite clear, the pursuit of happiness. Achievement of happiness is not guaranteed anywhere except the bible. It gives you a road map on how to achieve bliss. It works too.

  • 1 decade ago

    Some people happiness is to see people suffering specially if you are at the top 5% and want to remain there.

  • 1 decade ago

    Happiness means different things to different people. If setting fires makes you happy, you obviously don't have the right to achieve it.

  • ?
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    The pursuit is more important than the destination...nearly always

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.