what do i need to do to become and astronomy/physics teacher?

so ive recently really gotten into astronomy, like really into it, and i was wondering what id need to do in order to become and astronomy/physics teacher, cuz teaching is the other thing ive thought of doing, so what kind of schooling/degrees would be good for that?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Tips on Teaching Astronomy

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    It is sometimes said that astronomy is so exciting that it teaches itself. But that's not true. You will have to call on your full range of professional skills to teach it effectively. Much is known about effective teaching and learning of astronomy, but much of it is hidden away in education research journals, not widely accessible to teachers.

    One thing to remember is that you are expected to be "the guide on the side, not the sage on the stage". Here are a few collected words of wisdom which may help.

    1. According to constructivism, students form new concepts by building on old ones. But their minds are not empty slates; they have deeply-rooted misconceptions. Some are based on fundamental concepts such as light and gravity. Others come from popular culture, and a variety of other places.

    2. Teachers hold most of the same misconceptions. You can try an on-line misconceptions test at: http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/~ewoodruff, and also learn more about "co-investigation". There are also some excellent activities at: http://www.learner.org/teacherslab/pup/ -- the Private Universe Project.

    3. Students have special problems with three-dimensional concepts like eclipses and moon phases -- especially as textbooks show these phenomena from two different frames of reference: the observer's frame, and the external frame. And many conceptual problems are based on the enormous scales of distance and time. It's difficult to understand moon phases unless you realize that the moon is relatively far from the earth.

    4. Piaget was right when he said that concepts must be introduced at the appropriate stage of intellectual development. It's difficult for the average grade 5 student to understand the cause of moon phases.

    5. Terminology! Are you surprised that students confuse eclipse, ecliptic, and elliptic? And that they think that a light year is a unit of time?

    6. Teachers at all levels overestimate what their students know and learn. Monitor students' understanding. And avoid curriculum overload. Teaching more astronomy should come second to teaching it better.

    7. Inquiry-based teaching is the most effective. Hands-on is good; minds-on is better. Have students discuss patterns, devise possible explanations, make and test predictions.

    8. Expertise in astronomy does not guarantee expertise in teaching it; again, we university professors are a good example. By the same token: you can teach astronomy effectively, even if you are not an expert. Take advantage of this web site to get a bit of background; then take advantage of your professional training.

    9. All of education is subject to research, assessment, and improvement. That goes for this website.

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  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    You could be both at the same time but it's not going to be easy. To be an oncologist you will require around twelve to eighteen years of studies. Medical school is notoriously hard, even the best students struggle. To be an astrophysicist you need university degrees, and while it may not seem as scary as medical school, very few graduates in astrophysics actually become astrophysicians since only the top few are taken. Although if you really love astronomy, physics and math then you shouldn't really have many problems. You can also turn autodidact and teach yourself some of the basics so that when you go to medical school and/or university, you'll be slighty ahead. It will also help you get better marks on your entrance exams. Good luck !

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  • eri
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    You can teach physics (and astronomy, if the school offers it) at the high school level with a 4-year college degree (BA, BS) and teaching certification (or a masters degree and certification in California).

    If you want to teach at the community college level, you'll need at least a masters in astronomy. To teach at the college level, you need a PhD.

    If you want to get a masters or PhD in astronomy, major in physics in college - astronomy classes are useful, but physics is absolutely essential for getting into a graduate program in astronomy or astrophysics. A PhD is a research degree, so it can take 8 - 12 years of college total to earn.

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  • 1 decade ago

    The requirements for teaching at the high school level vary from state to state. In Nebraska, you have to major in education at an accredited institution and, after three and a half years, pass the proficiency exam in your selected areas of specialization (in this case, physics). In Alaska, you would major in astronomy or physics and take a few classes to prepare you for the state licensing requirements. You should be able to find your state's requirements with a quick pass through Google.

    Teaching at a college level, like the previous poster said, means getting a Ph.D. and spending several years as a post-doc student waiting for someone to die or retire to open up a faculty spot. Astronomy programs tend to be ridiculously competitive, mostly because the science is exacting and a lot more people express interest in the field than the available grants can support. To put this in perspective--take the number of astronomy majors at your college, divide that number by the number of professors who teach astronomy at your college (probably one, unless you go to Caltech or U of Arizona), multiply it by the average length of tenure for your professors (probably 30 years), and that will give you a rough estimate of how many people you have to outperform to get a faculty position teaching. We're talking the top hundredth of a percent here.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    To teach at the high-school level, you need at least a BA in physics, followed by some graduate work leading eventually to a master's degree. (You can start teaching before you get that far.)

    Astronomy is not a course commonly taught in high schools, but it is certainly part of physics and it would be a good idea to take some advanced astronomy courses in college.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I have a bunch of friends who have gotten into teaching.

    If you want to teach at a elementary/high school level, you'll want to do a major in physics or astronomy (or minor in one or both) at a university. Also, be sure to take some english courses.

    After your undergrad degree (B.Sc), apply to techer's college, where you get a B.Ed (Bachelor of Education). The minor/major you do in undergrad will give you a "teachable" in that field (at least that's what its called at Uof T (Toronto)).

    If you want to teach at a college/university level, you'll need to get a PHd in physics and/or astronomy (lot of work!).

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Ummmm...not to burst your bubble or anything, but...go get an advanced degree IN physics and astronomy first.

    And then DO IT for a few years.

    THEN teach it.

    The last thing we need are more people out there in classrooms teaching crap they've never actually done.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Brush ur teeth

    comb ur hair

    apply loadz ov makeup....

    there u r....at nothing....

    u have to struggle 4 that !!!!!!

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