What is the difference between sarcasm and sardonicism?

Tell me and give me examples please.

4 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Sarcastic:

    Using remarks which clearly mean the opposite of what they say, and which are made in order to hurt someone's feelings or to criticize something in an amusing way.

    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?key=698...

    Sardonic:

    Showing a lack of respect in a humorous but unkind way, often because you think that you are too important to consider or discuss a matter.

    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?key=698...

    Example of the first one:

    A sarcastic remark directed at a person who consistently arrives fifteen minutes late for appointments might be, “Oh, you've arrived exactly on time!”

    http://www.answers.com/topic/sarcasm

    Example of the latter one:

    He distances himself from people with his nasty, sardonic laughter.

    http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/sardonic

    The difference between both words is slight and they are often used interchangeably. Although Sardonicism (connected with guffaw) characterizes —as distinct from Sarcasm— not a contumely or bitter, but a ferocious, painful derision.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sardonic

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    For the best answers, search on this site https://shorturl.im/ytpV7

    I think there's a difference, though not much. Sarcasm implies inclusion of the use of satire, or satirical remarks. The remarks are mocking and often 'caustic' or 'mean,' but 'satire' leaves open a slightly wider range of compassion. ADD: I say this because good satire includes compassion. Sardonicism is usually pure disdain and mockery. It's a word often used as a synonym for sarcasm, but lacks satirical quality. So I think 'sardonicism' is more "malicious, cynical and disdainful" than sarcasm. Don't much like either, but some use that way of mockery a lot.

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    The difference between the words is ironic in and of itself. I think that is the point of drawing distinctions between definitions of irony and expressions of it. Your always coming back to where you started....ironically.

    Sardonic is like a microcosm irony and Sarcasm is like macrocosm irony. Sardonicism is in relation to a presentation of human character and sarcasm concerns the implications of that character trait in relation to a larger story, narrative, or truth.

    Possibly.. my question is this...If you know something is ironic or going to be ironic doesn't it stop being ironic? I mean if your expectation is already for that which would be consider contrary then your expectations cant be subverted and irony can not exist; but I guess the expected thing becomes ironic. How can the expected thing be ironic? Logical is it impossible to expect the unexpected by this argument?

  • 4 years ago

    Sardonicism

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.