What are the rules for child labor?

i am in jr. high and want to get a job

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  • michr
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    for info about hours you can work, work permit, job suggestions, interview information etcetera go to: http://www.youthrules.dol.gov

    there are links for each state with info for employers, educators, parents and TEENS

    at 14 or older you can work in an:

    office,

    grocery store,

    retail store,

    restaurant,

    lodging facilities,

    movie theater,

    baseball park,

    municipal parks(city or county),

    amusement park, or

    gasoline service station just to name a few……………….

    some businesses that do hire 14 and 15 year old employees include:

    McDonald's, Burger King, Chic-Fil-A, Sonic, Krogers, Publix, Stop & Shop, Hardee's, Dollar Store, Target

    most businesses are independently owned or operated so their policies for hiring minors may vary. although it is legal to work not all operators will hire those under 16 so just apply everywhere, the worse that can happen is you don't get hired.

    you also have all the options available to those under 14:

    You can deliver, or sell at a street stand, newspapers and periodicals (selling subscriptions is not allowed)

    You can work as an actor or performer in motion pictures, television, theater or radio.

    You can work in a business solely owned or operated by your parents.

    You can work on a farm owned or operated by your parents.

    When school is out of session you can work on a private farm picking and selling fruits and vegetables.

    (most agriculture employment falls under a different set of laws not part of FLSA and in some states allows agricultural employment as young as 10)

    you always have the options of casual labor(working for an individual):

    You can mow lawns and other yard work(as casual labor only)

    You can clean houses(as casual labor only)

    You can wash cars(as casual labor only)

    You can Tutor(as casual labor only)

    You can work as a pet-sitter/dog-walker(as casual labor only)

    You can assist the elderly.(as casual labor only)

    You can work as a baby-sitter.(as casual labor only and some states do restrict the age for baby-sitting)

    just to name a few ideas............................

    Source(s): US Department of Labor YouthRules! http://www.youthrules.dol.gov
  • 1 decade ago

    All states set their own laws regarding child labor. Here are the Federal guidelines:

    Minimum Age for Non-hazardous Work

    In jobs that are not considered particularly hazardous, the FLSA sets the normal minimum age for employment in agriculture at 14 years, whereas in every other industry the normal minimum age is 16 years.

    In agriculture there are three exceptions to the normal age 14 minimum age:

    (1) A child of ages 12 or 13 may work where a parent or guardian (a) consents to the child’s employment or (b) is employed on the same farm as the child.

    (2) A child under age 12 may work where (a) the child is employed by a parent or guardian on a farm owned or operated by the parent or guardian, or (b) the child is employed, with the consent of a parent or guardian, on a small farm as defined in the FLSA.

    (3) A child of age 10 or 11 may work as a hand-harvest laborer for no more than 8 weeks in a year.

    In all other industries apart from agriculture, there is four exceptions to the normal age 16 minimum age:

    (1) A child of age 14 or 15 may work in an occupation (except in mining or manufacturing) only if the Secretary of Labor determines that such work would not interfere with the child’s schooling or health and well-being. Using this authority, the Secretary has issued regulations permitting children of ages 14 and 15 to work in limited, specified jobs in retail food service, and gasoline service establishments.

    (2) Child actors and performers are not subject to the FLSA’s child labor protections.

    (3) Children engaged in the delivery of newspapers to the consumer are not subject to the FLSA’s child labor protections.

    (4) Children working at home in making evergreen wreathes are not subject to the FLSA’s child labor protections.

    Source(s): Here is a link to the federal department of labor youth rules website. http://www.youthrules.dol.gov/
  • Judy
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    Usually those are state laws - check the labor department on your state's website, there's probably some info there. Depending on your age, if you are in jr hi your options are probably pretty limited.

    Good luck.

  • 1 decade ago

    In some instances, you can work on farms, in a limited capacity for a family business or it's the old paper route / babysitting until you're of age.

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