Is this English sentence right?

You are not who I thought you were.

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Is it right if I use "whom" instead of "who"?

why?

thank you

Update:

“Because they're referring to the same thing, they both need to be in the subjective form”

“A predicate noun or pronoun ("who") is in the nominative case, like a subject”

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In this sentece "It's me." why not "It's I".

6 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    "Who" is correct. This is because whenever you use a linking verb, such as am, is, or are, the subject and the "object" (which is called the subjective compliment or the predicate nominative) are referring to the same thing. Because they're referring to the same thing, they both need to be in the subjective form. So, since "you" is the same as "(not) who I thought you were," you need to use the subjective form of who (who), and not whom.

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  • 1 decade ago

    "Who" is correct there; "whom" is not. ""Whom" is the form to use for the object of a verb (Whom did he hit with the car?) or the object of a preposition (Whom did she come with?, He came with whomever he wanted to.).

    More-than-you-wanted-to-know department:

    In your sentence, the basic grammatic element is "who ... you were". "Were" is a linking verb and does not take an object, but rather a predicate noun, pronoun, or adjective. A predicate noun or pronoun ("who") is in the nominative case, like a subject ("Who are you?").

  • 1 decade ago

    Who is the correct word. Whom is usually used to refer to a particular person. Like, "Whom did you go out with last night?" or "My mother, whom I live with".

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Technically, 'it's I' which is correct.

    'It's me' is accepted by standard usage.

    With linking verbs such as verb to be, it is the subjective case which is needed except when you have a preposition following the verb as in:

    It's for me to sort it out.

    not

    It's for I to sort it out.

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  • 1 decade ago

    it depends on why you are using it if youa re talking in old english then yes it is def ok

  • 1 decade ago

    it's alright dude, u can use it. it sounds alright.

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