What parts of the mouth enables us to speak?

Parts of the mouth that makes us capable of talking

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    tongue and the vocal chords

  • 1 decade ago

    The voice is produced in the voice box or larynx which is located in the throat where the adam's apple is in men. It is a part of the trachea or windpipe that leads to the lungs. There are 2 vocal cords, like flaps that open and close to make sound appear. In the mouth the tongue helps pronounce words correctly. The hard palate at the top of the mouth is also important and that is why individuals with cleft palate cannot pronounce words correctly unless it is repaired. Again people with tongue tie where the tongue cannot move properly because there is a membrane that holds the tongue down have trouble pronouncing words and people with a stroke affecting the tongue muscles also have difficulty pronouncing words correctly.

  • Kes
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    The vocal chords vibrate when tensed with air expelled by the diaphragm and a column of air resonates above and below the vocal chords. The shape of the mouth chamber can modify the resonations (Oh or ah, etc.) The tongue placement can control release of an explosive (Da, ta or la, etc.) or a non-explosive (Yaa). The lips can also control release of an explosive (Baa or pa, etc.) or a non-explosive (Waa). When the nasal cavity is permitted to modify the resonance (nasal sounds) a person can 'speak through the mask' and attain a pleasant sound (if not overdone).

    A very fine singer can break a very fine crystal glass using resonance rather than power. A candle held between the glass and lips won't even flicker.

  • 1 decade ago

    Speech is produced when air from the lungs is valved by the vocal cords, soft palate, tongue, teeth, and lips. It is similar to water travelling through a hose being crimped or closed from time to time.

    The lungs, which are supported by the abdominal and lower back muscles (NOT the diaphragm, despite popular belief) are the "power source" for vocal loudness.

    The vocal cords produce the vibrations which produce pitch.

    The throat, nose, and mouth are "resonating chambers" and produce the timbre of the voice.

    The soft palate closes off the nose when all sounds except for n, m, and ng are produced. These 3 sounds are resonated in the nasal cavity.

    The tongue valves against the hard and soft palates and teeth for all other speech sounds except for p, b, m, n, and ng. P and b are valved strictly by the lips and are called "plosives" because the air behind them "explodes" during their productions (t, d, k, and g are also plosives). Thye lips also valve (by remaining closed) for the sounds n, m, and ng so the air is directed through the nose.

    Source(s): I was a speech pathologist.
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Vocal cords produce the sound and all parts of the mouth form the words. The tongue, cheeks, teeth, and even the nose all affect speech.

  • 1 decade ago

    tongue, teeth, lips, (and even though they aren't a part of the mouth) the vocal cords and the diaphragm

  • 1 decade ago

    air vibrating your vocal chords make the sound, your lips and tongue shape that sound into words and noises.

  • 1 decade ago

    Vocal Chords and tongue!

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Your tongue!

  • 1 decade ago

    tongue

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