First make a substitution and then use integration by parts to evaluate the integral: (x^7)(cos(x^4))dx?

First make a substitution and then use integration by parts to evaluate the integral: (x^7)(cos(x^4))dx

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  • MeMeMe
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    ∫(x^7)(cos(x^4)dx

    Now substitute:

    t=x^4

    dt/dx=4x^3

    dx=dt/4x^3

    = ∫(x^7)(cos(t))dt/4x^3

    = 1/4∫(x^7)/(x^3)(cos(t))dt

    = 1/4∫(x^4)(cos(t))dt

    Remember that t=x^4:

    = 1/4∫t*cos(t)dt

    Integration by parts:

    ∫u'*v = [u*v] - ∫u*v'

    u' = cos(t) => u = sin(t)

    v = t => v' = 1

    = 1/4 (sin(t)*t - ∫sin(t)*1dt) + C

    = 1/4 [sin(t)*t - (-cos(t))] + C

    Now substitute back t=x^4

    = 1/4 (sin(x^4)*x^4 + cos(x^4))+C

    I hope I didn't make any mistakes

  • 5 years ago

    ∫ e^(cos(t))sin(2t) dt put cos(t) = u Didderentiate - sin(t) dt = du Therefore ∫ e^(cos(t))sin(2t) dt = ∫ (e^u}{-2u*du} = -2∫ e^(u)*u du limits will change when x =π then u =0 and when x= 0 then u = 1 Integrate by part = 2{e^u *u - integrate(e^u)du} lmits are from 0 to 1 = 2{u*e^u -e^u} limits are from 0 to 1 =2{(1*e -e)- (0-1)} = 2 ....................Ans

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