promotion image of download ymail app
Promoted

Bleeding to death?

How would it feel too bleed to death and how long would it take?

28 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    How would it feel to bleed to death and how long would it take?

    It depends on whether the bleeding is arterial or venous. If an artery is severed, the rate should be increased (although occasionally an artery will spasm and close itself down quite a bit). In the case of an injured artery, the blood would squirt out with each pump of the heart. After you lose about one liter of blood (an adult has about 5 liters) you experience signs of shock.

    Venous bleeding is usually slower, described as "oozing."

    Remember that bleeding can be external or internal, but the same things apply. For example, internal bleeding can be caused by bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract (esophagus, stomach and gut). External bleeding can be due to a traumatic injury.

    If the big blood vessel coming off the heart (aorta) is punctured by a knife or bullet, the bleeding would be fast, because it is like a high pressure hose and the muscle making up the wall of that blood vessel cannot "clamp down" very much. If the same injury occurred in the heart, the muscle making up the heart can help partially close up the wound, so that it takes longer for the injured person to "bleed out." Some people have been known to run several city blocks with such an injury to the heart after being attacked.

    If an injury occurred to the external surface of the body, there are pain receptors in the skin that would certainly register severe pain. After some time, maybe the body's own pain substances (endorphins) might kick in. Also, if one was involved in doing certain things (for example, fighting in a battle), all of the adrenalin pumping might cause the person to overlook their own injury.

    After the initial injury, the person would get dizzy and "woozy." This would be worse when standing then when sitting or lying down. The pulse starts to get weak and "thready", because the heart tries to keep the blood pressure up. The person starts to feel anxious; something is very wrong. Eventually when the blood pressure drops below some critical level (which is going to be a little different for each person), the heart starts to go into an electrical disturbace called a cardiac arrhythmia.

    So, if a simple small blood vessel was cut (especially a vein) and pressure or a tournaquet was not applied (for example the person was unconscious and nobody was around to help), it could take many hours to bleed to death. If you had a severe injury to a critical artery it could take just a few minutes.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • gonser
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Bleeding To Death

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    Bleeding to death

    Several stages of haemorrhagic shock

    The speed of exsanguination, as bleeding to death is known, depends on the source of the bleed, says John Kortbeek at the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada, and chair of Advanced Trauma Life Support for the American College of Surgeons. People can bleed to death in seconds if the aorta, the major blood vessel leading from the heart, is completely severed, for example, after a severe fall or car accident.

    Death could creep up much more slowly if a smaller vein or artery is nicked - even taking hours. Such victims would experience several stages of haemorrhagic shock. The average adult has 5 litres of blood. Losses of around 750 millilitres generally cause few symptoms. Anyone losing 1.5 litres - either through an external wound or internal bleeding - feels weak, thirsty and anxious, and would be breathing fast. By 2 litres, people experience dizziness, confusion and then eventual unconsciousness.

    "Survivors of haemorrhagic shock describe many different experiences, ranging from fear to relative calm," Kortbeek says. "In large part this would depend on what and how extensive the associated injuries were. A single penetrating wound to the femoral artery in the leg might be less painful than multiple fractures sustained in a motor vehicle crash."

    Source(s): Google
    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    Bleeding to death?

    How would it feel too bleed to death and how long would it take?

    Source(s): bleeding death: https://tr.im/Wtag0
    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 3 years ago

    Bled To Death

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    it really depends... bleeding to death from an open heart wound takes only minutes, but being shot repeatedly in the stomach takes a while. and it's painful.

    Source(s): I've bled to death... TWICE.
    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • <3
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    Depends from where you're bleeding, and how bad the bleeding is.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 4 years ago

    Bleeding to death would make you very cold.

    You would get dizzy. And start to feel very tired and exhausted. Very lethargic and weak

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Depends on how fast you're bleeding.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    Depends on where you are bleeding from,you would feel weak,dizzy and cold,how long? don't know, if you cut an artery then i should think it would take minutes.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.