Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureReligion & Spirituality · 1 decade ago

Does Buddhism have a creation story?

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  • P'ang
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Although it's not well known, both the Buddha and later Buddhist philosophers did develop a model for the origin of the universe and its structure. Surprisingly, this early Buddhist model is fairly consistent with some modern cosmologies, despite the fact that it's 2,500 years old.

    Very briefly, Buddhist cosmology describes the universe as cyclical -- sequential universes arise and disappear over very long periods of time ("mahakalpas" -- a period of 4 "kalpas"). Each universe arises from a "primordial wind" and disappears through a great fire that destroys the entire universe. Then the process begins again.

    A kalpa is sometimes described like this: Imagine a solid block of granite one cubic mile in size. Every year a dove flies by the cube and brushes it lightly with its wing. A kalpa is how long it takes for the granite to erode away from the dove's action. A long time...

    The link below will give you more information on this topic than you probably want.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddhist_cosmology

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  • 4 years ago

    There is NO Buddhist teaching on the creation/origin of life. All Buddhists believe that after death, (if we have not achieved enlightenment in life), we return to one of the 5/6 realms. The sect I follow believe in 6 realms: Gods, demigods, humans, animals, hungry ghosts or hell. So, you can be reborn as a god or animal or...... Some sects have NO teaching about how this occurs. The Tibetans (and some others) have very exact and intricate teachings about what happens between death and the next birth. EDIT: There is no teaching on creation, one reason being that time is not linear. You have to uderstand time and the concept of time either from a Buddhist perspective or quantum physics perspective. (I must admit that I do not and very few people I know do), but rest assure, there is NO Buddhist teaching on creation or how things came to be here

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Just to clarify, no self does not mean there is no self at all. The emptiness of self is not nothingness, but the mere absence of an inherently existent or independently existent self. The self that does exist is an 'I' imputed by consciousness in dependence upon the aggregates of body and mind appearing. This applies to other phenomena too, so when we say their is nothing created and no one to create it, this does not mean nothing exists at all or that there is no self that exists at all. Buddha taught the middle way, not nihilistic view. Therefore, phenomena do exist, but not in the way they are conceived to exist by the self-grasping mind. For further reading, consult books about emptiness such as Heart of Wisdom (tharpa publications).

    As for Buddhism being a branch of Hinduism, this is a common misconception. There are some similarities in certain labels such as karma, reincarnation, and even the chakra system. However, upon close investigation we find that the beliefs, practices and goals behind such labels in Buddhism are very different from Hinduism. I'll leave the specific research to those who care to check, but I guarantee there is a huge difference.

    Vajraboy was given a thumbs down for his explanation of people just being mind, yet it is true. Buddha Shakyamuni did explain this, but it is from the point of view of certain universal lifecycles such as is explained by P'ang in his posting.

    Buddha taught that all existent phenomena are appearances to mind produced by karma. Karma is the universal law of cause and effect applied to the person, and is a sanskrit term meaning action. It refers to various things such as the intention that initiates actions of body speech and mind, and to the results or effects of those actions. Mind produces actions and these place potentialities in the mind. When conditions come together, those potentialities (causes) manifest appearances to the mind (effects). In short, mind is the creator of all phenomena, thus phenomena are constantly being created and destroyed by mind.

    As you can see, although Buddha did explain many cosmological things, he was giving his disciples an idea of what is going on and faith that Buddhas have a galactic transdimensional perspective. This gives practitioners faith in attainments, and this is the main reason Buddha taught at all, for people to attain liberation from suffering.

    These days there is very little attention given to Buddhist cosmology by Lamas (except in Kalachakra Tantra) because the most important thing is to practice and gain the realizations that protect us and others from suffering, not to waste precious time getting overly concerned with how things were created.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Yes,buddhism have the story,but they are not created by someone who may be writer.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Not that I'm aware of. Buddhists believe in "dependent origination" which means that everything has a beginning in everything else. Nothing can be "created".

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    There is one. It says that originally we were all mind. Some partook of a magic food that caused desire for physical form and it all kindof went downhill from there.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Buddhist are not concern about the creation.

    They are more concern about end of suffering.

    http://www.letusreason.org/Buddh1.htm

    http://www.buddhism-connect.org/default.asp?id=131...

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  • neil s
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    No, nor a creator, nor anything or anyone to be created.

    Source(s): Anatman - no self
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