i want to know about, the characteristics of capscicum,about their usual diseases, pest,?

and also the suitable plant growth regulator for capscicum

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Capsicum is a genus of plants from the nightshade family (Solanaceae) native to the Americas, where it was cultivated for thousands of years by the people of the tropical Americas, and is now cultivated worldwide. Some of the members of Capsicum are used as spices, vegetables, and medicines. The fruit of Capsicum plants have a variety of names depending on place and type. They are commonly called chili pepper, capsicum, red or green pepper, or sweet pepper in Britain, and typically just capsicum in Australia and Indian English. The large mild form is called bell pepper in the US. They are called paprika in some other countries (although paprika can also refer to the powdered spice made from various capsicum fruit).

    The original Mexican term, chilli (now chile in Spanish) came from Nahuatl word chilli or xilli, referring to a huge Capsicum variety cultivated at least since 3000 BC

    Capsicum contains approximately 20-27 species,[7] five of which are domesticated: C. annuum, C. baccatum, C. chinense, C. frutescens, and C. pubescens .[8] Phylogenetic relationships between species were investigated using biogeographical,[9] morphological,[10] chemosystematic,[11] hybridization,[12] and genetic[7] data. Fruits of Capsicum can vary tremendously in color, shape, and size both between and within species, which has led to confusion over the relationships between taxa.[13] Chemosystematic studies helped distinguish the difference between varieties and species. For example, C. baccatum var. baccatum had the same flavonoids as C. baccatum var. pendulum, which led researchers to believe that the two groups belonged to the same species.[11]

    Many varieties of the same species can be used in many different ways; for example, C. annuum includes the "bell pepper" variety, which is sold in both its immature green state and its red, yellow or orange ripe state. This same species has other varieties as well, such as the Anaheim chiles often used for stuffing, the dried Ancho chile used to make chili powder, the mild-to-hot Jalapeño, and the smoked, ripe Jalapeño, known as a Chipotle.

    Most of the capsaicin in a pungent (hot) pepper is concentrated in blisters on the epidermis of the interior ribs (septa) that divide the chambers of the fruit to which the seeds are attached.[14] A study on capsaicin production in fruits of C. chinense showed that capsaicinoids are produced only in the epidermal cells of the interlocular septa of pungent fruits, that blister formation only occurs as a result of capsaicinoid accumulation, and that pungency and blister formation are controlled by a single locus, Pun1, for which there exist at least two recessive alleles that result in non-pungency of C. chinense fruits.[15]

    The amount capsaicin in hot peppers varies very significantly between varieties, and is measured in Scoville heat units

    to get ore details go to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capsicum

    Diseases of Pepper

    (Capsicum spp.)

    Ken Pernezny, Pam Roberts, John Murphy, and Natalie Goldberg, primary collators

    BACTERIAL DISEASES

    Bacterial spot

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Doidge) Dye and X. vesicatoria

    Bacterial wilt

    Ralstonia solanacearum (E. F. Smith) Yabuuchi et al.

    Bacterial canker

    Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis

    Syringae seedling blight and leaf spot

    Pseudomonas syringae van Hall

    P. syringae pv. syringae

    FUNGAL AND RELATED DISEASES

    Anthracnose

    Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (Penz.) Penz. & Sacc.

    in Penz.

    C. capsici (Syd.) E. J. Butler & Bisby

    Glomerella cingulata (Stoneman) Spauld. &

    H. Schrenk [teleomorph]

    C. coccodes (Wallr.) S. J. Hughes

    Cercospora (frogeye) leaf spot

    Cercospora capsici Heald & F. A. Wolf

    Charcoal rot

    Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goidanich

    Choanephora blight (wet rot)

    Choanephora cucurbitarum (Berk. & Ravenel) Thaxt.

    Damping-off and root rot

    Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn

    Phytophthora spp.

    Fusarium spp.

    Pythium spp.

    Downy mildew

    Peronospora tabacina D. B. Adam

    Fusarium stem rot

    Fusarium solani (Mart.) Appel & Wollenw. emend. Snyd.

    & Hans.

    Fusarium wilt

    Fusarium oxysporum Schlechtend.: Fr. f. sp. capsici

    f. sp. nov.

    Gray leaf spot

    Stemphylium solani G. F. Weber

    S. lycopersici (Enjoji) W. Yamamoto

    Gray mold

    Botrytis cinerea Pers.:Fr.

    Phytophthora blight

    Phytophthora capsici Leonian

    Powdery mildew

    Oidiopsis sicula Scalia

    O. taurica E. S. Salmon [synanamorph]

    Leveillula taurica (Lev.) Arn. [teleomorph]

    Southern blight

    Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc.

    Athelia rolfsii (Curzi) Tu & Kimbrough [teleomorph]

    Verticillium wilt

    Verticillium albo-atrum Reinke & Berthold

    V. dahliae Kelb.

    White mold

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary

    NEMATODE DISEASES

    Root knot

    Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid & White) Chitwood

    M. hapla Chitwood

    M. javanica (Treub) Chitwood

    M. arenaria (Neal) Chitwood

    Sting nematode

    Belonolaimus longicaduatus Rau

    Other nematodes

    Paratrichodorus spp.

    Trichodorus spp.

    Pratylenchus penetrans (Cobb) Filipjev & Schuurmans

    Stekhoven

    Nacobbus aberrans (Thorne) Thorne & Allen

    Dolichodorus heterocephalus Cobb

    Helicotylenchus dihystera (Cobb) Sher

    Hemicycliophora arenaria Raski

    Radopholus similis (Cobb) Filipjev

    DISEASES CAUSED BY PARASITIC SEED PLANTS

    Dodder

    Cuscuta spp.

    VIRAL DISEASES

    Alfalfa mosiac

    genus Alfamovirus, Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV)

    Andean potato mottle

    genus Comovirus, Andean potato mottle virus-pepper strain (APMoV)

    Beet curly top

    genus Curtovirus, Beet curly top virus (BCTV)

    Chili leaf curl

    Possibly strain of Tobacco leaf curl virus (TLCV)

    Chili veinal mottle

    genus Potyvirus, Chili veinal mottle virus (ChiVMV)

    Chino del tomate

    genus Begomovirus, Chino del tomate virus (CdTV)

    Cucumber mosaic

    genus Cucumovirus, Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV)

    Pepper golden mosaic complex (previously Texas Pepper, Serrano Golden Mosaic, and Pepper Mild Tigre Viruses)

    genus Begomorvirus, Serrano golden mosaic virus (SGMV), Pepper mild tigre virus (PMTV), and others

    Pepper huasteco

    genus Begomovirus, Pepper huasteco virus (PHV)

    Pepper mild mottle

    genus Tobamovirus, Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMV)

    Pepper mottle

    genus Potyvirus, Pepper mottle virus (PepMoV)

    Pepper veinal mottle

    genus Potyvirus, Pepper veinal mottle virus (PVMV)

    Potato virus Y

    genus Potyvirus, Potato virus Y (PVY)

    Sinaloa tomato leaf curl

    genus Begomovirus, Sinaloa tomato leaf curl virus (TCLV)

    Tobacco etch

    genus Potyvirus, Tobacco etch virus (TEV)

    Tobacco mosaic and Tomato mosaic

    genus Tobamovirus, Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV)

    Tomato spotted wilt

    genus Tospovirus, Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV)

    POSTHARVEST DISEASES

    Bacterial soft rot

    Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora (L. R. Jones)

    Bergey et al.

    E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica (Van Hall) Dye

    E. chrysanthemi (Burkholder et al.)

    Pseudomonas spp.

    Alternaria rot

    Alternaria alternata (Fries) Keissler

    Botrytis fruit rot

    Botrytis cinerea Pers.:Fr.

    Rhizopus rot

    Rhizopus stolonifer (Ehrenb.:Fr) Vuill.

    ABIOTIC DISORDERS

    Blossom-end rot

    Deficiency of calcium in fruit

    Sunscald

    Exposure of fruit to sunlight and heat

    hope thisheped you :)

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Capsicum is a genus of plants from the nightshade family (Solanaceae) native to the Americas, where it was cultivated for thousands of years by the people of the tropical Americas, and is now cultivated worldwide. Some of the members of Capsicum are used as spices, vegetables, and medicines. The fruit of Capsicum plants have a variety of names depending on place and type. They are commonly called chili pepper, capsicum, red or green pepper, or sweet pepper in Britain, and typically just capsicum in Australia and Indian English. The large mild form is called bell pepper in the US. They are called paprika in some other countries (although paprika can also refer to the powdered spice made from various capsicum fruit).

    The original Mexican term, chilli (now chile in Spanish) came from Nahuatl word chilli or xilli, referring to a huge Capsicum variety cultivated at least since 3000 BC, according to remains found in pottery from Puebla and Oaxaca[1].

    BACTERIAL DISEASES

    Bacterial spot

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Doidge) Dye and X. vesicatoria

    Bacterial wilt

    Ralstonia solanacearum (E. F. Smith) Yabuuchi et al.

    Bacterial canker

    Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis

    Syringae seedling blight and leaf spot

    Pseudomonas syringae van Hall

    P. syringae pv. syringae

  • 1 decade ago

    I don't know where you live-what your climate is, thus it would be frivolous to speculate upon what "characteristics" you refer to, & what types of diseases, pests, etc your particular environment nurtures; But here are some links you can peruse:

    http://www.g6csy.net/chile/database.html

    76 capsicum varieties...were registered in Russia Alone!http://www.freshplaza.com/news_detail.asp?id=17776

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