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Which is the best Greek New Testament version?

1) Textus Receptus

2) Westcott Hort

3) Nestle-Aland

4) UBS

5) Other

Which version do you use the most? Why do you prefer it?

Update:

Doesn't the Nestle-Aland provide a near exhaustive list of textual variants? Isn't the Majority Text contained within Nestle-Aland?

9 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Nestle Aland by far. Edition 27.

    The text is identical with UBS4 but it has far more details on variant readings.

    Westcott Hort is great, but out of date.

    The TR has words that do not appear in any Greek manuscripts, because Erasmus translated parts from Latin where he didn't have a Greek manuscript. It is by far the worst.

    Hundreds of manuscripts, older than the Byzantine Greek, have been discovered since the time of Erasmus. These put us much closer to the original writings.

    Hodges and Farstad is a ludicrous farce, though it does prove that the UBS is closer to the Majority text in Revelation than the TR is.

    Tichendorf and Greisbach are usable. Bover and Merk are OK, but not great.

    My own New Testament according to the Egyptian Greek Text is based on NA27 but for direct comparison to the Sahidic and Bohairic Coptic dialects.

  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    Which is the best Greek New Testament version?

    1) Textus Receptus

    2) Westcott Hort

    3) Nestle-Aland

    4) UBS

    5) Other

    Which version do you use the most? Why do you prefer it?

    Source(s): greek testament version: https://tr.im/g4WdL
  • 6 years ago

    As per the late Pastor Chuck Smith it is Farstad and Hodges Majority. The Westcott & Hort is a liberal, politically correct version but it is far less reliable. The King James and New King James versions of the Bible rely on the Majority text because it was done so meticulous and was translated by multiple translators with varying ecclesiastical backgrounds with multiple checks and balances - unlike the New International and other modern English versions

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    There is very little difference between these versions. I recommend Farstad and Hodges Majority text for the text and the comments. I recommend the UBS just to get the other point of view.

    Anyone can tell you that the majority text is the correct text unless there has been a purposeful manipulation in the textual transmission of the NT (something that W-H called the Lucan Recension, for which there is absolutely no evidence).

    Many scholars prefer the UBS because that is how they were introduced to the Greek New Testament.

    I had both Hodges and Farstad as teachers, they were both outstanding Christian men and scholars. The comment by your other answerer is offered out of prejudice and ignorance. Read the texts and commentaries on them yourself.

    The Nestle Aland textual apparatus normally contains the variants that represent the Majority text. The Majority text of Hodges and Farstad has (in my opinion) an easier to read apparatus and it contains and identifies the Nestle Aland text (under the name of 'the critical text').

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  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    The Greek translation was prepared from the Hebrew by Hebrew scholars in Alexandria, Egypt for the Pharaoh Ptolemy during the third century B.C. originally. So unless you are going to learn classical Hebrew or Greek, I'd recommend you use a copy that you can actually read. I wouldn't describe it as "believing in" any translation, but rather trusting the translators to have had a desire to produce a true translation that was as correct as any translation can be. Different languages don't translate exactly most of the time; therefore, language scholars do the best they can while preserving the intent and meaning. Look at how many different interpretations we get from people reading the bible in their shared language and you may begin to understand the difficulty translators have. We believe in God and trust that he inspires these brave souls to produce accurate renderings of the sacred texts so that they can help us to learn about our God and what we need to know to serve him best.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The Zondervan "Parallel New Testament in Greek and English"

    I prefer it because any questions you may have about the Greek is answered immediately on the same page in English.

    This version was put out by the Zondervan Bible Publishers of Grand Rapids, Michigan in 1975.

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    For the best answers, search on this site https://shorturl.im/awrt4

    God tells us in the Old Testament that He is going to establish a New Convenient with us. This New Convenient started when Jesus died for our sins. We are now no longer under the Law, but under grace. Jesus fulfilled the law, and those that are "in" Christ are not judged by the law. Those that have rejected Him, will have no option but be judged by it. The Law condemns, so no one judged by the law will enter into Heaven. We need to know what the Old Testament says because it is the bases for all the New Testament. But, as Christians, we follow the New Testament, because, as I said, we are no longer under the law.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The Textus Receptus is based upon the earliest Byzantine manuscripts and is the most accurate. It is the official New Testament of the Orthodox Church.

  • 1 decade ago

    The Textus Receptus is the most traditional and I like it because it is based on the Byzantine text-type.The Westcott Hort text is okay, because it relied somewhat on the Byzantiene type-text.

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