Noah asked in Cars & TransportationSafety · 1 decade ago

are airplanes safe? and what is turbulance?

i am rely scared of airplanes and i go on one soon and i am rely scared if it will break down or something.even if it happens is there life boats on the plane. please help!

2 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Yes, airplanes are safe. Turbulence unexpected airflow at a given time and place. If you could see air, you'd notice that it flows exactly like water. It has ripples, big waves, small waves. If you've ever seen churning water as in a river or behind a boat....THATS turbulence. When you feel it in an airplane, think of it as "potholes" in the air. The plane can take 2-3 times its weight in turbulent jolts. Pilots know where the airplane-bending turbulence is and will avoid those places. Sorry, there is nothing comparable to a lifeboat on a plane. Airplanes are solid and reliable. Their critical systems have 2,3, sometimes 4 back-ups. Flying is safer than driving. There are fewer things to hit and you have several eyes helping you look for those things. Take Dramamine before you board. It works better as a preventative measure. Let yourself enjoy this new experience. I've flown millions of miles and I'm still here to tell about it.

    Source(s): I'm a pilot.
    • Login to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    They are very safe but make sure that you take some Dramamine before the flight just to calm you....

    Dramamine is used to prevent and treat nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and vertigo associated with motion sickness.

    Turbulence is caused by rapid, irregular motion of the air. It brings about bumps or jolts, but does not normally influence the intended flight path of an aircraft to a large extent.

    However, in severe turbulence, abrupt changes in the altitude and attitude of an aircraft may occur and the pilot may momentarily lose control of the aircraft.

    Source(s): 316
    • Login to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.