General Practice Lawyer??

When a lawyer is described as a General Practice Lawyer, what does it mean?

For example injuries or anything

13 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    It means they don't specialize. If you have a simple legal issue, need a lawyer to draw up some straightforward and run-of-the-mill documents (including simple wills, contracts, etc.), a general practitioner can be useful, partly because you can conceivably see them often enough to develop a personal relationship, so that they know your individual needs better than specialists who have the average client come in once or twice in a career.

    The risk of a GP lawyer is that he isn't likely qualified to take on highly complicated files requiring an indepth knowledge or experience of a particular area of law. Like a GP doctor, he *ought* to refer you out to a specialist in such a case. But some lawyers think far too highly of their own skills, and that's when they often end up making fools of themselves. And their clients.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 3 years ago

    General Practice Law

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    General Practice Lawyer??

    When a lawyer is described as a General Practice Lawyer, what does it mean?

    For example injuries or anything

    Source(s): general practice lawyer: https://bitly.im/jXD05
    • Login to reply the answers
  • 3 years ago

    General Practice Attorney

    • Login to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 1 decade ago

    A general practice attorney typically provides service to private individuals or small businesses. Think of a general practitioner like you would a primary care physician.

    Some examples of things most lawyers who consider themselves general practioners do are:

    1. State & Local Criminal Defense

    2. Personal Injury \ Automobile Accidents

    3. Workers' Compensation

    4. Social Security Disability

    5. Simple Wills & Powers of Attorney

    6. Probate Administration (no estate tax)

    7. Civil suits

    8. Landlord\Tenant

    9. Family Law \ Divorce \ Child Custody

    Some items which are typically more specialized:

    1. Most Federal Court Criminal Defense

    2. Bankruptcy

    3. Tax Law

    4. Estate Planning (which is a form of tax law)

    5. Large Estate Probate

    6. Real Estate Closings

    7. Real Estate Litigation (quiet title \ boundary disputes)

    8. Major Felony Criminal Defense \ Death Penalty Cases

    9. Administrative Law

    10. Municipal \ Government Law

    11. Securities Law \ Regulation

    12. Environmental Law (CERCLA, etc.)

    13. Appeals (but most General Practioners can handle a straightforward appeal in one of their regular practice areas)

    14. Media Law

    15. Civil Rights \ Police Misconduct

    16. Employment Law

    17. Medical Malpractice \ Pharmecy Litigation

    18. Legal Malpractice

    19. Mass Torts

    20. Class Action Lawsuits

    Typically your lawyers who represent insurance companies or big business have their practice areas limited to just one or two catagories.

    In smaller markets you have a higher percentage of more general practioners. Some of your best attorneys are general practioners (you can make just as much if not more money as a GP in many instances). Although the attractions to specialization can be earning a good fee and having more control over your schedule and caseload.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    Getting a law degree and passing the bar exam do not qualify a lawyer to specialize. It takes a few years of practice and/or study, perhaps a second law degree (LL.M.), to concentrate; but even then the states and the profession are not set up to formally recognize a specialist's skill.

    Most lawyers starting out on their own have to take the cases that walk in the door. It would be a luxury to restrict the practice to a special area of law.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    General practice law means they handle most areas of law especially for individuals. It also means that they do not have an expertise or specialty. You would see a general practice lawyer for an uncomplicated sale of a house, most personal injuries, adoption, and divorce for example. Normally you would not see a general practice lawyer for maritime disputes, military law, mergers, acquisitions, or probating a large estate.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    It means to me that the advertising lawyer who is in "general practice" but is "willing" to take a seriously injured, blameless accident victim, commonly called "sure winners." Law due to the oversupply of lawyers has become absurdly specialized. Even mindless areas of the law like divorce law has been made into specialties! You shop for a specialist for all areas of law. Tax and securities lawyers have always been talented. The "general practitioner" is an endangered species.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    They do routine items, real estate, a little estate work for simple asset cases, a little civil, helping someone set up a corporation... perfectly fine for the day to day legal work most people need.

    If it's a high $$ civil suit or criminal defense case, or a medical malpractice, wrongful death suit, etc, then an attorney that specialized in that area would be better.

    Source(s): I'm a civil suit and criminal defense investigator.
    • Login to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    1

    Source(s): Self Defence Training http://netint.info/UltimateSelfDefenseGuide/?rWvF
    • Login to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.