How search engines work (plese look inside)?

A few questions.

1. How do seach engines find things about what a website is about besides useing the <meta> tag?

2. How can you get the top result on a search engine if your basic thing is put in. (Ex. Landmark Missionary Baptist Church, right now the (just about) only way to find out site it to type in a nearby location)

3. Is the only way that search engines find things are by robots and by people submitting URLs?

4. How does your URL affect the search results?

5. How much does it cost to pay search engines to be the first results?

6. Is there a simple way to submit your sire to a whole bunch of search engines at once?

7. Is there any other ways besides the <meta> tag to add tags to your result?

If you want to add more, feel free!

When you answer, please add the number of which you are ansewring.

Thanks, the best answer will get 11 points! (not 10)!!!!!

Update:

Please don't just say yes, I need information, not just yes, of course. . .

3 Answers

Relevance
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    all i know is this:

    A search engine operates, in the following order

    1. Web crawling

    2. Indexing

    3. Searching

    Web search engines work by storing information about many web pages, which they retrieve from the WWW itself. These pages are retrieved by a Web crawler (sometimes also known as a spider) — an automated Web browser which follows every link it sees. Exclusions can be made by the use of robots.txt. The contents of each page are then analyzed to determine how it should be indexed (for example, words are extracted from the titles, headings, or special fields called meta tags). Data about web pages are stored in an index database for use in later queries. Some search engines, such as Google, store all or part of the source page (referred to as a cache) as well as information about the web pages, whereas others, such as AltaVista, store every word of every page they find. This cached page always holds the actual search text since it is the one that was actually indexed, so it can be very useful when the content of the current page has been updated and the search terms are no longer in it. This problem might be considered to be a mild form of linkrot, and Google's handling of it increases usability by satisfying user expectations that the search terms will be on the returned webpage. This satisfies the principle of least astonishment since the user normally expects the search terms to be on the returned pages. Increased search relevance makes these cached pages very useful, even beyond the fact that they may contain data that may no longer be available elsewhere.

    When a user enters a query into a search engine (typically by using key words), the engine examines its index and provides a listing of best-matching web pages according to its criteria, usually with a short summary containing the document's title and sometimes parts of the text. Most search engines support the use of the boolean operators AND, OR and NOT to further specify the search query. Some search engines provide an advanced feature called proximity search which allows users to define the distance between keywords.

    The usefulness of a search engine depends on the relevance of the result set it gives back. While there may be millions of webpages that include a particular word or phrase, some pages may be more relevant, popular, or authoritative than others. Most search engines employ methods to rank the results to provide the "best" results first. How a search engine decides which pages are the best matches, and what order the results should be shown in, varies widely from one engine to another. The methods also change over time as Internet usage changes and new techniques evolve.

    Most Web search engines are commercial ventures supported by advertising revenue and, as a result, some employ the controversial practice of allowing advertisers to pay money to have their listings ranked higher in search results. Those search engines which do not accept money for their search engine results make money by running search related ads alongside the regular search engine results. The search engines make money every time someone clicks on one of these ads.

    The vast majority of search engines are run by private companies using proprietary algorithms and closed databases, though some are open source.[citation needed]

    Revenue in the web search portals industry is projected to grow in 2008 by 13.4 percent, with broadband connections expected to rise by 15.1 percent. Between 2008 and 2012, industry revenue is projected to rise by 56 percent as Internet penetration still has some way to go to reach full saturation in American households. Furthermore, broadband services are projected to account for an ever increasing share of domestic Internet users, rising to 118.7 million by 2012, with an increasing share accounted for by fiber-optic and high speed cable lines.

    Source(s): my knowledge
  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    Google

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    search engine... is like google...

    the answer :

    1 google was search not a tag but word in every web site...

    google is every web pay to google to make they site will showed when someone search in google...

    2 in the top of page 1, (first site when you open)

    3 not robot it's automaticly...

    4 web pay to google

    5 idk ask the google

    6 yes

    7 yes ofcourse

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.