Alex G asked in Society & CultureLanguages · 1 decade ago

What's the difference between "freedom" and "liberty"?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    isn't it obvious that their difference is their spelling? hehehe, i'm just trying to make you laugh.

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  • 6 years ago

    Liberty- The ability to be able to do the anything, right or wrong. Liberty is limited by rules.

    Freedom has to do with rights. Freedom is bound by rights.

    Source(s): Latin Language
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  • 1 decade ago

    Theoretically, none, they just come from 2 different roots. Freedom comes from old English Fréodóm, from the Anglo-Saxon Germanic tribes (originally it could have been something like 'frijadoma', but of course no one really knows for sure), where as Liberty is shared with French Liberté (which I presume comes from the Latin language). They essentially mean the same thing, and thus are synonyms, but to different people they sometimes seem very different (e.g. one might think 'freedom' means that someone/thing has only just become free, while one might think 'liberty' is more general, e.g. 'Our country runs on the foundations of Liberty and Equality'). Hope this helps!

    Source(s): Ex German/French student, linguaphile. Word roots on wiktionary.org.
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  • 5 years ago

    you may have the liberty (opportunity, ability) to step on someones' toes but you don't have the freedom (there are rules and limitations).

    Can't stop one from thinking about something, but will stop from doing the thing you think about.

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  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    Which one should be use, If I refer to it as a value?? Liberty or Freedom

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I believe there is a fundamental difference, not in the linguistic history of the said terms (of course there is one), but in the modern American literal meaning(s).

    Liberty-basically the ability to be able to do the right thing, as one perceives the right thing/action to pursue/perform.

    Freedom-well, a lot here really. I think in general, it'd be the absence of barriers when planning and performing whatever it is one wishes to do.

    Officially: liberty-1: the quality or state of being free: a: the power to do as one pleases b: freedom from physical restraint c: freedom from arbitrary or despotic control d: the positive enjoyment of various social, political, or economic rights and privileges e: the power of choice

    AND

    freedom-1: the quality or state of being free: as a: the absence of necessity, coercion, or constraint in choice or action b: liberation from slavery or restraint or from the power of another : independence c: the quality or state of being exempt or released usually from something onerous <freedom from care> d: ease, facility <spoke the language with freedom> e: the quality of being frank, open, or outspoken <answered with freedom> f: improper familiarity g: boldness of conception or execution h: unrestricted use <gave him the freedom of their home>

    Source(s): Me and the MW dictionary
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  • 1 decade ago

    LIBERTY - noun

    Definition: The state of not being in confinement or servitude.

    Synonyms: emancipation, freedom, liberation, manumission

    FREEDOM - noun

    Definition: The condition of being politically free.

    Synonyms: autonomy, independence, independency, liberty, self-government, sovereignty

    Both words are synonyms of the other. Little difference if any.

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  • 1 decade ago

    freedom=unrestricted use:i give him the freedom of my house

    liberty=freedom from oppressive control:individual liberty

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  • 1 decade ago

    "'Freedom' emphasizes the opportunity given for the exercise of one's rights, powers, desires, or the like: freedom of speech or conscience; freedom of movement. [...] 'Liberty'', though most often interchanged with freedom, is also used to imply undue exercise of freedom: 'He took liberties with the text'."

    "freedom", Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1) : http://dictionary.reference.com/search?r=2&q=freed...

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  • 1 decade ago

    In the English language, there are many words that come from Latin origin, from the time when the Romans conquered the British. So these latin words have remained inthe language and are used somewhat more formally, while the Anglosaxon equivalents are more everyday language. Eg

    Latin............................... Anglosaxon

    liberty............................ freedom

    abandon ...................... give up

    prohibit ....................... forbid

    chastise ...................... punish

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  • 1 decade ago

    None, freedom, has Germanic origin, and liberty Latin one

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