What does the term "blue bloods" mean?

I've seen the term used in a number of books, but i really would like to know where the phrase originated

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    It originated in France to describe royalty and the aristocracy of the day. Unlike the serfs and peasants who worked and were exposed to sunlight, the R and A rarely, if ever found themselves exposed to the sun and therefore had extremely pale skin. Now, if you have ever seen someone with very pale skin, you know that the blood veins and vessels appear to be blue, which gave rise to the term "Blue Blood".

  • 3 years ago

    Blue Blood Meaning

  • rocca
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    Blue Blood Definition

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Rich Peoples. I was hobnobbing with the blue bloods.

    The term seems to come from the Spanish term for "old rich" known as the Sangre Azul (blood blue). It may also denote authority and possibly even nobility.

    Being "blue-blooded" was very popular during the 1920's, when the "old rich" wanted to differentiate themselves from the "new rich." This term is a central theme in "The Great Gatsby" by F.Scott Fitzgerald.

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  • KGSD
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    It refers to an long-established family of great wealth.

    "Old-money"

    ADD:

    It’s a direct translation of the Spanish sangre azul. Many of the oldest and proudest families of Castile used to boast that they were pure bred, having no link with the Moors who had for so long controlled the country, or indeed any other group. As a mark of this, they pointed to their veins, which seemed bluer in colour than those of such foreigners. This was simply because their blue-tinted veins showed up more prominently in their lighter skin, but they took it to be a mark of their pure breeding.

    So the phrase blue blood came to refer to the blood which flowed in the veins of the oldest and most aristocratic families. The phrase was taken over into English in the 1830s.

  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

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    RE:

    What does the term "blue bloods" mean?

    I've seen the term used in a number of books, but i really would like to know where the phrase originated

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  • 1 decade ago

    Blue bloods is a term used for royalty. The phrase comes about because the royals had servents do everything for them (in some extreme case even feeding them!). Lack of activity over long periods of time your blood becomes less oxygenated and appears a blue color.

  • 1 decade ago

    1. Noble or aristocratic descent.

    2. A member of the aristocracy.

    [Translation of Spanish sangre azul : sangre, blood + azul, blue (probably from the visible veins of fair-complexioned aristocrats).]

    http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=blue+bloo...

    http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Blue+Bloods

    someone who has blue blood is from a family of the highest social class.

    "He has a fair bit of blue blood coursing through his veins."

    http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/Blue+Bloods

    1. Noble or aristocratic descent.

    2. A member of the aristocracy.

    [Translation of Spanish sangre azul : sangre, blood + azul, blue (probably from the visible veins of fair-complexioned aristocrats).]

    Marine Corps Dictionary: Blue Blood

    Former enlisted Marine who crossed over and accepted a commission.

    http://www.answers.com/topic/blue-blood

    Synonyms: aristocrat (n), patrician (n), True Blue,

    blue blood of Castile, Sang Bleu.

    Movie/TV Titles:

    Blue Blood (1973)

    Captain Blue Blood (1935)

    Blue Blood (1925)

    White and Blue Blood Red (1917)

    Blue Blood But Black Skin (1916)

  • 4 years ago

    For the best answers, search on this site https://shorturl.im/F91z2

    blue-col·lar [bloo-kol-er] Show IPA adjective 1. of or pertaining to wage-earning workers who wear work clothes or other specialized clothing on the job, as mechanics, longshoremen, and miners. Compare white-collar. white collars are the doctors. lawyers, engineer types hope this helps!!

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