Anonymous
Anonymous asked in TravelAsia PacificTaiwan · 1 decade ago

Is Taiwan an Independent Country?

Is Taiwan an independent country or is is part of the People Republic of China?

17 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    The reason that the Republic of China (ROC) on Taiwan is not able to get admitted to the vast majority of international organizations as an independent sovereign nation can be summed up nicely by saying "no territory."

    In other words, the ROC on Taiwan does not hold "legal title" to the areas of Formosa and the Pescadores.

    The claim that the ROC had sovereignty over the areas of Formosa and the Pescadores up to 1949 is clearly false. There had been no transfer of territorial sovereignty of these areas to the ROC at any time prior to this date. In fact, in 1949 the post-war peace treaty had not yet come into effect!!

    The acceptance of the surrender of Japanese forces was done according to the directions of US General MacArthur. In General Order No. 1 of Sept. 2, 1945, MacArthur directed a Chinese ally -- Chiang Kai-shek, of the Republic of China -- to go to Taiwan and accept the surrender of the Japanese troops stationed there. In legal terms, MacArthur's order created an agency arrangement for the military occupation of Taiwan: The United States being the principal occupying power, with Chiang Kai-shek's ROC troops fulfilling the role of a subordinate occupying power.

    Then in late 1949 a large number of high-ranking officials of the ROC fled to occupied Taiwan from the mainland, thus becoming a government in exile.

    In the post war San Francisco Peace Treaty of April 28, 1952, Japan renounced the sovereignty of Taiwan without specifying a receiving country. The Sino-Japanese Peace Treaty of August 5, 1952, confirmed these arrangements.

    In other words, from 1945 to the present, there are no international treaties or other legal documents which can show that the territorial sovereignty of Taiwan has ever been transferred to the ROC. Without any such proof of transfer, the ROC on Taiwan merely remains as (1) a subordinate occupying power, and (2) a government in exile.

    There has been no change in this status to date. Hence, the ROC on Taiwan has "no territory." With "no territory" the ROC on Taiwan cannot be considered an independent sovereign nation.

    (The issue of what country is actually holding the territorial title to Taiwan is a separate matter. However, it is certainly not the PRC.)

  • Diane
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    do you want to start world war three? The one hot button China has is Taiwan. China considers Taiwan as still part of China. If it declares it's Independence China will invade. The U.S. would have to honor it's treaty and WW3 would be on. China will wait as long as Taiwan keeps the status quo. So while the reality might be that Taiwan is independent it just can't say so.

  • 1 decade ago

    It really depends on what is defined by an Independent Country.

    If an Independent Country is defined by being able to join the United Nations as a political and sovereign entity, being recognized by most of the other countries in the world as a separate and sovereign state from China, then Taiwan is NOT an independent country, and it will not be in the near future.

    However if an independent country is simply defined as a state being able to formulate its own policies, its government is chosen by its own people, it has its own armies, laws, and its people has the right to choose their way of life, yes, Taiwan is an independent country.

  • 5 years ago

    I am Taiwanese. I was born in New Zealand but was brought back to Taiwan to be raised there up until the start of High school.

    In my honest opinion, China claiming Taiwan is not a country is absurd. But to get to that conclusion, we'd need to look at history.

    The Republic of china (A.k.a. ROC) Had come to power by overthrowing the imperial rule of Qing Dynasty and replaced it with a Democratic government (Only the so called 'Blue' party was allowed until 1980s). At this point, Taiwan is still unified to China's Mainland. It is then invaded by Japan (WWII) and the government, in a treaty, signed over the ownership of Taiwan to the Japanese. After the war, the Japanese surrendered, their troops and Governing officials left and the power was given back to the Democratic government. During the war, In China, they were only able to hold back the Japanese advances by the combined power of the army of ROC and The 'People's liberation Army' which is Communist. The communists and the Democratic Capitalist government disagreed with each other so much they waged war on each other. It is unclear which side had started the civil war. At this point in history, people living in Mainland china started choosing sides, unknowing the complete disconnection (many families ended up split on two sides of the strait, unable to write letters or travel to the other side of the strait) the end of the civil war ended with. The civil war left ROC with control over Taiwan (This may not be argued to be false if any logic is applied) And Mainland China is now under control of what is now People's republic of China (PRC). Up until 1971, ROC (Taiwan) held a UN membership as China. This is not 'stealing' the power from PRC since the PRC was completely disconnected from the rest of the world up until than and after all, the ROC had been the official government of the entirety of China until a civil war torn it apart.

    Now, why does the most part of UN not recognize ROC as a country? The answer is simple. The PRC, upon replacing ROC in the UN seat marked as 'China' carried on the hatred of the ROC and every nation knows, the PRC will never allow ROC in the UN and Mainland China, being a world superpower has overwhelming influence over many countries. Most countries did not bother arguing against China, Including the US.

    As you might have noticed, the topic over wether or not Taiwan should be a part of 'A Greater China' is very controversial. But as a final effort to persuade you that Taiwan should be a State on it's own right, if you own one big piece and a small piece of a candy, which was from the same package. If another person comes along and buys the big piece, does it automatically gives the person ownership over the small candy?

    Source(s): Living in Taiwan and Taiwanese history education (basically Social Studies)
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  • 1 decade ago

    Taiwan is a de facto independent nation.

    I live here. We have never been governed from Beijing. I understand how mainland Chinese people feel about territorial integrity, and I understand the right of the people of Taiwan to self-determination. They have grown accustomed to democracy, after a few decades of martial law.

    It is hard to consider Taiwan as part of China, after 60 years of independence and autonomy.

    The sole purpose of our armed forces is to deter Chinese aggression. We all want a peaceful resolution--no matter what side of the strait we live on.

    I don't care whether Taiwan ever becomes a recognized sovereign nation. I want the way of life, and the freedom, and the prosperity of the people here to be preserved--as part of China or not.

  • 6 years ago

    I understand that when China want to have the power over Taiwan they will get it. However I think China is not interested in taking any action against Taiwan, at least for now.

  • 1 decade ago

    In history Still a part of PRC.not a independent countries in UN. or to 99 % to other countries.but can call Taiwan as fully Independent place, is not a state and not a countries now ! the government is nothing to do with PRC.total not control by PRC.Taiwa have there own,very own army . Only when Taiwa announce it become Independent , and agree by UN, with POSITION in UN as a countries, than we can name Taiwan as Independent Countries !! ( for those who think Taiwan is independent countries , please check , what position Taiwan hold in UN ?, and any so call Taiwa embassy in USA/EURO/Russia/Asia ? )

  • 3 years ago

    Both Taiwan and China are part of Republic of China, therefore technically Mainland China is part of Taiwan (ROC)

  • 1 decade ago

    It depends on what side:

    > On PRC's (People's Republic of China) side, Taiwan is not an independent country, and it is a breakaway province of the Mainland... plus, they have this "One China Policy" (FYI, both "China" and "Taiwan" use the term Zhonghua, which is "Chinese" or "China" in a cultural sense, on their official names)

    > On ROC's (Republic of China) side, they claim they are independent and a democratic, republican country... but I think only about 21 countries or so recognize Taiwan's independency..

  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    Taiwan has her passport herself.

    Taiwan has her military herself.

    Taiwan has her president herself.

    Taiwan has been a country before PRC (China).

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