Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Social ScienceAnthropology · 1 decade ago

A person with blood type B is heterozygous. What is that person's genotype?

A person with blood type B is heterozygous. What is that person's genotype?

a. BB

b. OO

c. BO

d. AB

e. none of these

13 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    It is BO.

    You either have a genotype of BO or BB if you are blood type B. BB is homozygous, while BO is heterozygous.

    A person with blood type A would have a genotype of heterozygous AO or homozygous AA.

    A person with blood type O can only be homozygous OO.

    A person with blood type AB can only be heterozygous AB.

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  • slomka
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    Heterozygous Blood Type A

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  • Tammy
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    For the best answers, search on this site https://shorturl.im/avsSz

    The person with type O blood has the genotype OO (two alleles for having type O blood). This has to be the case because this allele is recessive. A person with type B blood has one of two possible genotypes: BB or BO (they can't be BA because then they would be blood type AB, not type B). The person with type B in this example is heterozygous for this trait, which means that the two alleles in their genotype are different. Therefore, the genotype of the person with type B is BO. A child of these two will inherit one allele from each parent. Since the parent with type O blood has two O alleles, the allele inherited from them will be O no matter what. The parent with type B blood has two different alleles they can pass on (B and O). So the genotype of a child would be either OO (phenotype Type O blood) or BO (phenotype Type B blood). They have a 50% chance of being type O and a 50% chance of being type B.

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  • 5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    A person with blood type B is heterozygous. What is that person's genotype?

    A person with blood type B is heterozygous. What is that person's genotype?

    a. BB

    b. OO

    c. BO

    d. AB

    e. none of these

    Source(s): person blood type heterozygous person 39 genotype: https://shortly.im/B5mwa
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  • 1 decade ago

    c because A would be dominant and if it was present the blood type would be A. if the blood type is B which it is and heterozygous then it would be B and another blood type such as O.

    edit:

    in writing it you would not say BO tho. you would write it as Bb to show that it is heterozygous.

    if your teacher makes you write it like that usually then you would say choice E so the anwser may actually be E if your teacher doesnt want it to be specific.

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  • 1 decade ago

    C . . . BB and AA are homozygous dominant, BO and AO are heterozygous, OO is homozygous recessive.

    Source(s): 8th grade science
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  • 1 decade ago

    BO, persons with blood group B are either BB which means they are homozygous or BO and they are hetyerozygous.

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  • Mab
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    BO, the first answer was right.

    OO is type O blood.

    BB is homozygous type B blood.

    AB is type AB blood.

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  • 1 decade ago

    BO...as in the question its heterozygous...if it was homozygous then it would b BB..

    NO OTHER ANSWER.

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  • 4 years ago

    In general, type O blood is recessive, so both of the person's parents would have had to had type O, and the person would be "OO". Heterozygous for type B blood could mean either "AB" or "BO". So if the spouse is "AB" each of their children would have an equal chance of being "AO" or "BO". If the spouse is "BO" each of their children would have an equal chance of being "BO" or "OO". To get an accurate answer, you'd have to factor in the existing proportions of "AB" and "BO" blood types. Apply those ratios to the otherwise equal chances of "AO" and "BO" for a "AB" parent, and "BO" and "OO" for a "BO" parent. For example, if the proportion of "AB" to "BO" in the general population is 1 in 4, the results would be as follows: From a "AB" parent with an "OO" spouse: — "AO" 12.5% — "BO" 12.5% From a "BO" parent with an "OO" spouse: — "BO" 37.5% — "OO" 37.5% Since there would be two ways to have a child with "BO" blood, the final ratios would be: — "AO" 12.5% — "BO" 50.0% — "OO" 37.5% Of course the exact answers would depend on the actual proportions of "AB" and "BO" in the general population. However, it might be hard to separate the "BO"s from the "BB"s in the general population to determine the "BO" frequency. They'd both test as "B" because the "O" in "BO" would be masked. One in four is just used as an example for the calculation.

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