Hamid A asked in PetsFish · 1 decade ago

what is better for goldfish rainwater of tap water and second thing do rainwater has chlorine?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Tap water is better for your goldfish. Use a dechlor for the water. Rain water does not contain chlorine although seems very clean sometimes has acid and depending on where you live near a large city or out in the country has many contaminants in it however these too can be removed with a water conditioner/dechlor since the dechlor usually will neutralize more than 60 varied chemicals in tap water.

    The main reason you want to stay away from Rain water is it does not have the PH level (on average 5.7) your fish need. You then will have to be playing with the PH levels.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Rainwater doesn't usually have chlorine in it, or at least not enough to notice.

    Which water is better for your fish will depend on what concentration of various chemicals is in either your rainwater or tap water. In some areas the tap water is actually cleaner then the rainwater, in others the reverse is true.

    Test your water sources to determine which is best in your area.

    Either way- don't collect rain that has come off your roof, gutter, or downspouts.

    Addendum:

    Rain water can contain major contaminants from pollution. Filtering it then boiling it is recommended. Its easier to just use tap water.

    http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/wea00/wea000...

    There are three parts to making rainwater potable: catchment, containment, storage.

    http://www.rain-barrel.net/drinking-rainwater.html

    That being said- here is a website for someone who created a rainwater collector for his garden:

    http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-build-a-rai...

    Source(s): An Ocenography class from college.
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  • 1 decade ago

    That depends on what's in your tap water, and in what concentration. In most cases, dechlorinated tap water is fine, especially for fish like Goldies that will readily adapt to different water parameters, but if it's extremely hard and basic, you may want to use a combination of rainwater and tap water, as the softer rain water will dilute the dissolved minerals in the tap water. Rainwater doesn't have meaningful levels of chlorine.

    EDIT: Simply setting the tap water out for a few days may allow the chlorine to dissipate, but chloramines, which are equally as toxic to fish, will remain in the water, and must be neutralized with a dechlorinating agent (make sure the bottle says it's effective against chloramine).

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  • 3 years ago

    because of the ingredients latest in tapwater many evaluate rainwater to be the least contaminated; the unlucky actuality, even with the undeniable fact that, is that throughout some areas the air can pollute the rainwater! yet another determination is to apply bottled water, yet this of direction would be greater high priced. faucet water consists of fluoride and chlorine that would desire to break gentle roots. additionally, the lime latest in faucet water in very 'annoying' areas is many times not advised, even with the undeniable fact that some experts declare that it incredibly is high quality for flowers different than: orchids, azaleas, gardenias and carnivorous flowers - those incredibly do unlike lime. (in spite of this, it might want for use in case you clear out first, then boil it and water the flowers whilst the water has reached room temperature). in case you do use tapwater, it incredibly is a sturdy concept to allow it stand for a minimum of 30 minutes formerly making use of - this would enable many of the chlorine to vanish and positioned across the water closer to room temperature (consistently use tepid water, fairly than incredibly chilly water). Water that would desire to incredibly be prevented is that dealt with by making use of water softeners, as this has a extreme salt content cloth which builds up in soil over a era of months.

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  • bds
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    Rainwater does not have chlorine. Rainwater would be good as long as it's not picking up contaminants like running off of a roof, or thru a gutter and down spout.

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  • 1 decade ago

    tap water is better, if you leave it out for several days. This will age the water naturally. Gas and chlorine will dissipate.

    Rain water should be okay as long it did not pickup any contaminates. But there is no guarantee. Run it through a charcoal filter

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Rainwater is NOT good!!! Use tap water with dechlorinator. Rainwater is very polluted. You have to figure, the air is filled with pollution. I look at citys and you can also see brown haze on the horizon. That is polution. That is also in the air right above you, you just can't see it. But as rain falls, the water particles actually pick up this polution. Rain water is very dirty. Have you ever noticed after it rains it leaves dirt streaks on your car? That is the water evaporating and all the gunk it picked up out of the air being left behind

    http://thecityfix.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/02/s...

    See that line of brown in the air in the horizon? That is smog! Dirt and pollutants in the air. DIRTY! THAT is in rainwater.

    Also rainwater doesn't have chlorine, but chlorine can be removed out of tap water. Just use tap water, its clean and perfectly fine.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    You can put both rainwater and tap water together in the tank if you want to. But first you would have to try it out and see if the fish are doing anything different.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Rainwater is fine to use as long as it is collected properly. Tap water is just as good for goldfishes and other aquatic creature, as long as they are treated/dechlorinated before use.

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