Anonymous
Anonymous asked in PetsHorses · 1 decade ago

What is automatic release?

i do jumping but i've only ever been taught about crest release. how do automatic release and crest release differ?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    automatic release follows farther along and lower down on the horses neck. basically when you do a crest release your hands go to a spot on the top of the neck, but sometimes, usually when show jumping or eventing, your horse will have to jump things in a different manner( maybe down banks, over water, or because spooking, etc.) and you have to accomodate so as not to bang him in the mouth. your hands should follow softy along the neck and should keep a nice line from elbow to bit. your hands will not be on top of the neck but along the sides. make sense? also, i think it has much to do with the differences between riding hunters and eventers/jumpers and also the size of the jump. there are two types of crest releases, long and short, but you still run the risk of catching his mouth if he needs to jump larger than you think or your reins aren't long enough. automatic release just keeps the elbow to bit line and follows the horses mouth forward over the jump and back when landing. very smooth.

  • 1 decade ago

    The auto, imo, it much prettier and more efficient than the crest-it's not really in style in the hunter ring(but it is coming back in the eq.) because a nice loose crest release demonstrates to the hunter judges that the horse is well mannered.

    The auto, as said is basically a follow through-the hands are much lower and form a straight line from the elbow and hand to the bit. Generally, you have to put you hands down much further, it feels ALOT different from the crest release. The problem is, that riders that are not totally independant with their seat and hands have the potential to fall forward, yank, etc., etc.

    To prep for auto release work you need to start jumping without your reins, jumping no-irons, and eventually both-which will form an independent and effective seat.

    The auto-release is desireable in showjumping because it can give the rider more control over fences-throwing the horse away over a very fast, twisting will ultimately lead to a less efficient ride(there are times that you need to literally turn over the fence-can't do that as well with a crest release) and more seconds on the clock.

    It's desireable in the Eq. ring because it demonstrates a good seat, strong legs, coordination, etc. - many eq. riders still use crest releases, but at the big. eqs the auto is starting to show up again.

  • 1 decade ago

    The others have described an automatic release pretty well. A great place to see examples is in Practical Horseman magazine, in George Morris' monthly feature where he analyzes four photos sent in by readers. Here he shows you different pros and cons in riding styles and describes them and why they are good/bad. It's a good feature that has taught me a lot about desireable form.

    A side note from an old person: I rode hunters and hunt-seat eq. in the 70s. Back then, we were never taught crest-release. The concept of resting your hands on your horse's neck, as I keep getting told now, was an absolute No-No. You didn't balance on your horse, you had to have a good enough seat to balance on your own. Back then, the automatic release was the only release I learned. Now as I do it, I get told to lean on my horses' neck for balance! Kinda funny, how things change.

  • gonser
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    I understand George Morris is regularly speaking approximately the automated unencumber and the way any "skilled rider" demands to be making use of an automated unencumber vs. a crest unencumber - however except you've each and every different elementary right down to a T and feature a teacher above all running with you on the way to do an automated unencumber correctly - you are definitely going to flub it up and the pass judgement on goes to realize this error greater than they might realize a crest unencumber rather of an automated one. It's a type of matters that is not quite indispensable for leaping some thing below four'. A crest unencumber is excellent and flawlessly ample mainly if you are displaying small hunter publications. The crest releases protects the pony's mouth it is simply no longer obvious as being as "flowing" or "soft" in transition.. I've on no account obvious a pass judgement on deduct facets at a exhibit rather than, say, a qualifying exhibit or the maclay for utilizing a crest unencumber rather of an automated one. And even one of the most riders on the Maclay nonetheless use extra of a crest unencumber.

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