Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Food & DrinkOther - Food & Drink · 1 decade ago

Are all the nutrition facts TRUE?

like the nutrition facts for bread and burger and candy . Are the nutrition fact true on it or just a lie to make you buy it

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    The "Nutrition Facts Label" is covered by various federal laws and supervised by the FDA. They make random inspections and work with the manufacturers if something is wrong. I wouldn't take the information on there as Gospel, but it appears that it's fairly reliable.

    Note that other claims on the package (like "made from real fruits" or whatever) are not similarly monitored. Also, not all foods are covered by federal labeling requirements - in particular, raw produce and fish do not need to be labeled. Also, dietary supplements have special rules.

    Another thing to note is that the information about what is healthy for you or not varies with time, and the laws are always lagging a bit. So for example, the fact label will make a big deal out of cholesterol, based on a historical supposition that cholesterol intake was directly related to cholesterol levels in your blood, which has since been shown not to be true.

    Conversely, the FDA conveniently avoids providing a %DV figure for sugar, even though a good approximation of the healthy amount of sugar to eat per day is about zero! And the fact that the sugar is probably HFCS (high fructose corn syrup) won't be very clear, either. On the FDA web site you can read that it's important to avoid artificially added sugars, but the aggro lobby has successfully managed to downplay that on the labels.

    So a good short answer might be: the numbers on the label are probably correct, but they may be a little tricky to interpret.

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  • 1 decade ago

    it depends. They're all true except they sort of bend the truth with serving size. When you eat cereal for example, the serving size is about 1/2 cup but you might eat 2 cups. The nutrition facts may end up decieving you by how much nutrition you are really comsuming compared to how much you think you are.

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  • ?
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    That seems like a reasonable value. I suspect there are severe penalties if they lie about the nutritional value or the ingredients. In this case size only determines how big the penalty is.

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  • 1 decade ago

    the poster that said that it has to be correct by law is right, however the thing that they do not tell you is that different foods cause chemical reactions in your body when eaten together. Example, mixed vegetables may be one number but by taking out or adding in brocolli it will dramatiacally change the nutritional values. If you are watching values the best thing is to invetigate the foods you like and how they work together.

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  • 1 decade ago

    well usually the case w/ nutrition facts is..... the higher the percentage... the more people buy it (which is a bad thing) i honestly don't know if their true or not but i just go w/ it. it'll just cause more disargeements in the world.

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  • 1 decade ago

    legaly they have to put the correct nutrition facts and ingredients because of diabetics, food allergies ect

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