Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsGeography · 1 decade ago

Different regions in Asia?

what are the different regions in Asia and their corresponding country? can you give them all? =)

5 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    Far East (Eastern Asia): China (including Hong Kong and Macau), North Korea, South Korea, Japan, Taiwan, Mongolia.

    Central Asia: Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan.

    Southern Asia (including Subcontinent): Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Nepal, India, Pakistan, Iran, Maldives, Sri Lanka

    South East Asia: Myanmar (Burma), Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Indonesia, Singapore, Malaysia, Brunei, Philippines, Vietnam, East Timor.

    Middle East (Western Asia): Turkey, Syria, Iraq, Lebanon, Israel, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Oman, Yemen, Jordan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Cyprus, Gaza & West Bank (Palestinian areas), Georgia,

    Northern Asia: Russia

    North Africa: Egypt (Sinai Peninsula, area east of Suez canal, though Egypt is often included as part of the middle east on cultural grounds.).

    Source(s): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asia ,,,^..^,,,
  • abell
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    Different Regions Of Asia

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    helpful :)

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
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  • 1 decade ago

    Asia

    Area 43,810,582 km² (16,915,360.3 sq mi)

    Population 3,879,000,000 (1st)[1]

    Density 89.07/km² (230.7)/sq mi)

    Demonym Asian

    No. of countries 37

    Countries Asian countries[show]

    Afghanistan

    Armenia

    Azerbaijan

    Bahrain

    Bangladesh

    Bhutan

    Brunei

    Cambodia

    China

    Cyprus

    East Timor

    India

    Indonesia

    Iran

    Iraq

    Israel

    Japan

    Jordan

    Kazakhstan

    Kuwait

    Kyrgyzstan

    Laos

    Lebanon

    Malaysia

    Maldives

    Mongolia

    Myanmar(formerly Burma)

    Nepal

    North Korea

    Oman

    Pakistan

    Philippines

    Qatar

    Russia

    Saudi Arabia

    Singapore

    Sri Lanka

    South Korea

    Syria

    Tajikistan

    Thailand

    Turkey

    Turkmenistan

    United Arab Emirates

    Uzbekistan

    Vietnam

    Yemen

    Dependencies Asian dependencies[show]

    Akrotiri and Dhekelia

    British Indian Ocean Territory

    Christmas Island

    Cocos (Keeling) Islands

    Unrecognized Republics & Regions Unrecognized Asian countries & regions[show]

    Abkhazia

    Gaza Strip (Palestine)

    Nagorno-Karabakh

    South Ossetia

    Taiwan

    Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus

    West Bank (Palestine)

    Languages Asian languages[show]

    more than 50 million native speakers:

    Arabic

    Armenian

    Azerbaijani

    Bengali

    Burmese

    Cantonese (Chinese)

    Divehi

    Dzongkha

    English

    Filipino

    Greek

    Hebrew

    Hindi

    Indonesian

    Japanese

    Javanese

    Kazakh

    Khmer

    Korean

    Kurdish

    Kyrgyz

    Lao

    Malay

    Mandarin (Chinese)

    Marathi

    Nepali

    Min (Taiwanese/Chinese)

    Mongolian

    Persian

    Portuguese

    Punjabi

    Russian

    Sinhalese

    Tajik

    Tamil

    Telugu

    Tetum

    Thai

    Turkish

    Turkmen

    Urdu

    Uzbek

    Vietnamese

    Wu (Chinese)

    Time Zones +2 to +12[show]

    +2

    +3

    +3:30

    +4

    +4:30

    +4:51

    +5

    +5:30

    +5:40

    +5:45

    +6

    +6:30

    +7

    +7:20

    +7:30

    +8

    +8:30

    +8:45

    +9

    +9:30

    +10

    +10:30

    +11

    +11:30

    +12

    Internet TLD .asia, many others

    Largest Cities Largest Cities in Asia[show]

    Tokyo

    Seoul

    Mumbai

    Jakarta

    Osaka

    Shanghai

    Manila

    Hong Kong

    Tehran

    Kolkata

    Beijing

    Asia is the world's largest and most populous continent. It covers 8.6% of the Earth's total surface area (or 29.4% of its land area) and, with over 4 billion people, it contains more than 60% of the world's current human population. Chiefly in the eastern and northern hemispheres, Asia is traditionally defined as part of the landmass of Eurasia—with the western portion of the latter occupied by Europe—lying east of the Suez Canal, east of the Ural Mountains, and south of the Caucasus Mountains and the Caspian and Black Seas. It is bounded on the east by the Pacific Ocean, on the south by the Indian Ocean, and on the north by the Arctic Ocean. Given its size and diversity, Asia—a toponym dating back to classical antiquity—is more a cultural concept incorporating a number of regions and peoples than a homogeneous physical entity[2][3] (see Subregions of Asia, Asian people).

    Contents [hide]

    1 Etymology

    2 Definition and boundaries

    2.1 Physical geography

    2.2 Political geography

    2.3 "Asian" as a demonym

    3 Territories and regions

    3.1 Country name changes

    4 Economy

    4.1 Trade blocs

    4.2 Natural resources

    4.3 Manufacturing

    4.4 Financial and other services

    5 Early history

    6 Languages and literature

    6.1 Nobel prizes

    7 Beliefs

    7.1 Mythology

    7.2 Religions

    7.2.1 Abrahamic

    7.2.2 Indian

    7.2.3 Other

    8 See also

    9 References

    10 Further reading

    11 External links

    Etymology

    Look up Asia in

    Wiktionary, the free dictionary.The word Asia originated from the Ancient Greek word "Ασία", first attributed to Herodotus (about 440 BC) in reference to Anatolia or, for the purposes of describing the Persian Wars, to the Persian Empire, in contrast to Greece and Egypt. Herodotus comments that he is puzzled as to why three women's names are used to describe one enormous and substantial land mass (Europa, Asia, and Libya, referring to Africa), stating that most Greeks assumed that Asia was named after the wife of Prometheus but that the Lydians say it was named after Asias, son of Cotys who passed the name on to a tribe in Sardis.

    Even before Herodotus, Homer knew of a Trojan ally named Asios and elsewhere he describes a marsh as ασιος (Iliad 2, 461). The Greek language term may be derived from Assuwa, a 14th century BC confederation of states in Western Anatolia. Hittite assu-—"good" is probably an element in that name.

    Alternatively, the etymology of the term may be from the Akkadian word (w)aṣû(m), which means "to go outside" or "to ascend", referring to the direction of the sun at sunrise in the Middle East, and also likely connected with the Phoenician word asa meaning east. This may be contrasted to a similar etymology proposed for Europe, as being from Akkadian erēbu(m) "to enter" or "set" (of the sun). However, this etymology is considered doubtful, because it does not explain how the term "Asia" first came to be associated with Anatolia, which is west of the Semitic-speaking areas, unless they refer to the viewpoint of a Phoenician sailor sailing through the straits between the Mediterranean Sea and the Black Sea.

    It is interesting to note, in Icelandic Saga, ancient Teutons separated Asia from Europe by the river Tanakvisl (or Vanakvisl), which flows into the Black Sea. Eastward across the River (in Asia), so legend tells, was a land known as Asaheim or Asaland, where dwelt Odin, chief god, in his citadel named Asgard.[4] However, Aesir and all its forms are related to Sanskrit asura and Avestan ahura, the local reflexes of the name of a class of divine beings.

    Definition and boundaries

    Physical geography

    See also: Geography of Asia, Countries in both Asia and Europe, Geographic criteria for the definition of Europe

    Physical map of Asia (excluding Southwest Asia).

    Two-point equidistant projection of Asia.Medieval Europeans considered Asia as a continent – a distinct landmass. The European concept of the three continents in the Old World goes back to Classical Antiquity, but during the Middle Ages was notably due to Isidore of Sevilla (see T and O map). The demarcation between Asia and Africa (to the southwest) is the Isthmus of Suez and the Red Sea. The boundary between Asia and Europe is conventionally considered to run through the Dardanelles, the Sea of Marmara, the Bosporus, the Black Sea, the Caucasus Mountains, the Caspian Sea, the Ural River to its source, and the Ural Mountains to the Kara Sea near Kara, Russia. While this interpretation of tripartite continents (i.e., of Asia, Europe, and Africa) remains common in modernity, discovery of the extent of Africa and Asia have made this definition somewhat anachronistic. This is especially true in the case of Asia, which would have several regions that would be considered distinct landmasses if these criteria were used (for example, Southern Asia and Eastern Asia).

    In the far northeast of Asia, Siberia is separated from North America by the Bering Strait. Asia is bounded on the south by the Indian Ocean (specifically, from west to east, the Gulf of Aden, Arabian Sea, and Bay of Bengal); on the east by the waters of the Pacific Ocean (including, counterclockwise, the South China Sea, East China Sea, Yellow Sea, Sea of Japan, Sea of Okhotsk, and Bering Sea); and on the north by the Arctic Ocean. Australia (or Oceania) is to the southeast.

    Some geographers do not consider Asia and Europe to be separate continents,[5] as there is no logical physical separation between them.[3] Geographically, Asia is the major eastern constituent of the continent of Eurasia – with Europe being a northwestern peninsula of the landmass – or of Afro-Eurasia: geologically, Asia, Europe, and Africa comprise a single continuous landmass (save the Suez Canal) and share a common continental shelf. Almost all of Europe and most of Asia sit atop the Eurasian Plate, adjoined on the south by the Arabian and Indian Plates, and with the easternmost part of Siberia (east of the Cherskiy Range) on the North American Plate.

    In geography, there are two schools of thought. One school follows historical convention and treats Europe and Asia as different continents, categorizing subregions within them for more detailed analysis. The other school equates the word "continent" with a geographical region when referring to Europe, and use the term "region" to describe Asia in terms of physiography. Since, in linguistic terms, "continent" implies a distinct landmass, it is becoming increasingly common to substitute the term "region" for "continent" to avoid the problem of disambiguation altogether.

    Given the scope and diversity of the landmass, it is sometimes not even clear exactly what "Asia" consists of. Some definitions exclude Turkey, the Middle East, Central Asia, and Russia while only considering the Far East, Southeast Asia and the Indian subcontinent to compose Asia,[6][7] especially in the United States after World War II.[8] The term is sometimes used more strictly in reference to the Asia-Pacific region, which does not include the Middle East or Russia,[9] but does include islands in the Pacific Ocean—a number of which may also be considered part of Australasia or Oceania, although Pacific Islanders are commonly not considered Asian.[10]

    Political geography

    RussiaMongoliaChinaJapanSouth KoreaNorth KoreaTaiwanIndiaPakistanNepalBhutanBangladeshMaldivesSri LankaVietnamThailandLaosCambodiaBurmaMalaysiaBruneiSingaporePhilippinesIndonesiaEast TimorKazakhstanUzbekistanKyrgyzstanTajikistanTurkmenistan

    EgyptAfghanistanIranSaudi ArabiaOmanYemenUAEQat.Bah.Kuw.IraqJordanIsr.SyriaLeban.TurkeyCyp.GeorgiaAzerbaijanArmenia

    "Asian" as a demonym

    See also: Orientalism.

    The demonym "Asian" is often used colloquially to refer to people from a subregion of Asia instead of for anyone from Asia. Thus, in British English, "Asian" can mean South Asian, but may also

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