Anonymous
Anonymous asked in SportsCycling · 1 decade ago

On road and off road bikes?

I'm looking for a bike that I will mostly use on road for the most of the time, but also capable of going on high adventure mountain trails once in a while. I'm not sure whether to go for an on-road bike or off-road mountain bike. And i seriously don't know the different specs that I would have to look for.

Thanks.

7 Answers

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  • Jacob
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Road bikes are fragile and cannot handle an off road trail. If you are only going to buy one bike, you will need to go for a mountain bike. Like already mentioned, 2 sets of tires is a good idea. I switch mine out all the time and am going to order a second set of wheels and have road tires on one set and off road tires on the other set.

    A mountain bike is not anywhere near as quick on the road as a road bike, but with the right tires makes a decent commuter bike. Two bikes is really the way to go, but for most of us that is not an option.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    i only have mountain bike's even though i like to ride on the rode and bike ride all over, i have a spare set of quick release wheels with 26 x 1.70 that take less than two min to swap depending where i'm wanting to travel i would suggest this way would be better if you were also wanting to use it to go of road a little, the tyres dont half make a great improvment! good luck. also if you buy a road bike you are basicaly stuck to do nothing but road riding at least with the mountain bike you have a choice.

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  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    The bicycle is extraordinarily efficient in both biological and mechanical terms. The bicycle is the most efficient human-powered means of transportation in terms of energy a person must expend to travel a given distance. From a mechanical viewpoint, up to 99% of the energy delivered by the rider into the pedals is transmitted to the wheels, although the use of gearing mechanisms may reduce this by 10–15%. In terms of the ratio of cargo weight a bicycle can carry to total weight, it is also an efficient means of cargo transportation.

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  • 1 decade ago

    if you run moslty run, look into a cyclo-cross bike. they have sturdy rigid frames, MTB style and durability, with road geometry and gearing. Most of the time, they have tires that bridge the gap OK, cantilever brakes for the offroad, and MTB hubs that can take the punishment of trails. I have a konda jake the snake and i commute everyday on it, but on weekends i take it to trails and it does 3 foot drops no problem.

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  • 4 years ago

    Rupert is offering you recommendations-blowing suggestion. In some states that is virtually impossible to make a airborne dirt and dust motorbike street criminal no count how plenty street kit you upload. If the unique "manufacturers fact of beginning place" defines the motorbike as an off street motor vehicle you're in serious hassle. Your first provide up should be your interior reach DMV before you spend any money on lights furniture, stators, etc. stable luck.

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  • M V
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    You could buy two sets of wheels for a mountain bike; one set of 'skinny wheels' for pavement, and knobbies for off road. Perhaps look at a 29'er mountain bike so you get the advantage of the bigger wheels on the pavement.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    You have no choice. If you will use it on rugged MTB trails you must get a MTB. You can't ride a road bike off road like that.

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