what are the characteristic of the lxodes dammini tick?

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  • Sand
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago
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    Have you ever consulted visited these site. If not then it is worth doing. There are more informations than you need.

    But, by the way, now it is called Ixodes Scapularis...dammini is old nomenculture...here is some characteristics

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    I. scapularis ( or dammini) is a three-host tick; each mobile stage feeds upon a different host animal. In June and July, eggs deposited earlier in the spring hatch into tiny six-legged larvae. Peak larval activity occurs in August, when larvae attach and feed on a wide variety of mammals and birds, primarily on white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) (Anderson and Magnarelli 1980). After feeding for three to five days, engorged larvae drop from the host to the ground where they overwinter. In May, larvae molt into nymphs, which feed on a variety of hosts for three to four days. In a similar manner, engorged nymphs detach and drop to the forest floor where they molt into the adult stage, which becomes active in October. Adult ticks remain active through the winter on days when the ground and ambient temperatures are above freezing. Adult female ticks feed for five to seven days while the male tick feeds only sparingly, if at all.

    Adult ticks feed on large mammals, primarily upon white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) (Piesman et al. 1979, Carey et al. 1980, Wilson et al. 1990). Beginning in May, engorged adult females typically lay between 1000 to 3000 eggs on the forest floor at the site where they detached from their hosts.

    Mortality rates for ticks are high. Tick death is caused by density-dependent factors such as parasites, pathogens, and predators, all of which appear to have little impact on tick populations (Roberts et al. 1983, Matthewson 1984, Mather et al. 1987a). Density-independent factors causing tick mortality include a variety of adverse climatic and microclimate conditions, which can influence temperature and humidity and have the greatest impact on tick survival (Bertrand and Wilson 1996). Due to their low probability of finding a host, starvation also would be a major mortality factor of ticks. Host immunity and grooming activity also may affect mortality (Randolph 1979, Brown 1988).

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    TO GET MORE.........

    Kindly just click and get linked....

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    1.Tick - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Ixodes scapularis (formerly Ixodes dammini), known as the black-legged tick or ... distribution of immature "Ixodes dammini" ticks correlated with deer. ...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tick

    2. blacklegged tick or deer tick - Ixodes scapularis Say

    ... read papers with references to Ixodes dammini should make note of this change. ... abundance of deer and that of the deer tick, Ixodes dammini (Acari: Ixodidae) ...

    http://creatures.ifas.ufl.edu/urban/medical/deer_t...

    3. EID Vol 3 No 2: A New Tick-borne Encephalitis-like Virus Infecting ...

    ... American Ixodes dammini, like related ticks in Eurasia, maintain tick-borne ... of deer-tick virus infection in adult Ixodes dammini sampled from deer ...

    http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/vol3no2/telford.htm

    4. Vector of Lyme Borreliosis, Ixodes Scapularis, identified in ...

    A passive surveillance program was initiated in Saskatchewan in 1998 to determine whether the blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis (formerly Ixodes dammini), was ...

    http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/publicat/ccdr-rmtc/99vo...

    Source(s): A biologist, M.Sc
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