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What are the oral vitamin "K" drops that they use in newborns?

Update:

I am not asking WHAT it does...I am asking the brand and dose that they give babies...it is not the shot.

8 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    The doctors/nurses at the hospital I delivered at gave us a bottle of "D-Vi-Sol Vitamin D Drops" and you can also buy them at the pharmacy. I am in Canada so not sure if they are different elsewhere.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Vitamin K is given to newborns to help their clotting factors. Adults receive their clotting factors from bacteria in their large intestine. Babies do not have this flora in their intestine yet so they receive an injection in the hospital and other forms of vit K once they go home. (sounds crazy but it is true)

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It is a jump start to the immunity system. It also helps with bold clotting and mineral absorption. We did a home birth with our first daughter and even the boho midwife we had said this was good for the baby.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The vitamin supplement for breastfed babies is called Poly-visol or Tri-visol (both have vitamin K in it). I think Enfamil makes both and I know it is available at Target. Hope this helps!

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  • 1 decade ago

    This may help.

    http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/drug-information/...

    See below, but it does not seem to advise oral form for newborns.

    * For menadiolFor oral dosage form (tablets):

    o For problems with blood clotting or increased bleeding, or for dietary supplementation:

    + Adults and children—The usual dose is 5 to 10 milligrams (mg) a day.

    * For injection dosage form:

    o For problems with blood clotting or increased bleeding, or for dietary supplementation:

    + Adults and teenagers—The usual dose is 5 to 15 mg, injected into a muscle or under the skin, one or two times a day.

    + Children—The usual dose is 5 to 10 mg, injected into a muscle or under the skin, one or two times a day.

    * For phytonadioneFor oral dosage form (tablets):

    o For problems with blood clotting or increased bleeding:

    + Adults and teenagers—The usual dose is 2.5 to 25 milligrams (mg), rarely up to 50 mg. The dose may be repeated, if needed.

    + Children—Use is not recommended.

    * For injection dosage form:

    o For problems with blood clotting or increased bleeding:

    + Adults and teenagers—The usual dose is 2.5 to 25 mg, rarely up to 50 mg, injected under the skin. The dose may be repeated, if needed.

    o For prevention of bleeding in newborns:

    + The usual dose is 0.5 to 1 mg, injected into a muscle or under the skin, right after delivery. The dose may be repeated after six to eight hours, if needed.

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  • 1 decade ago

    it helps their blood to clot - they usually give it as a pre-emptive thing incase the newborn has problems.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    For some reason I remember what you are talking about.... AND THAT STUFF TASTED NASTY!

    I'm 24 and I remember that stuff tasted bad... lol.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    exactly what you just said, vitamin K

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