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Anonymous asked in Education & ReferenceWords & Wordplay · 1 decade ago

what are the kinds of Adjective?please put the definition for each kind of adjective. thank you.?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    A given occurrence of an adjective can generally be classified into one of four kinds of uses:

    Attributive adjectives are part of the noun phrase headed by the noun they modify; for example, happy is an attributive adjective in "happy kids". In some languages, attributive adjectives precede their nouns; in others, they follow their nouns; and in yet others, it depends on the adjective, or on the exact relationship of the adjective to the noun. In English, attributive adjectives usually precede their nouns in simple phrases, but often follow their nouns when the adjective is modified or qualified by a phrase acting as an adverb. For example: "I saw three happy kids", and "I saw three kids happy enough to jump up and down with glee".

    Predicative adjectives are linked via a copula or other linking mechanism to the noun or pronoun they modify; for example, happy is a predicate adjective in "they are happy" and in "that made me happy". (See also: predicative, subject complement.)

    Absolute adjectives do not belong to a larger construction (aside from a larger adjective phrase), and typically modify either the subject of a sentence or whatever noun or pronoun they are closest to; for example, happy is an absolute adjective in "The boy, happy with his lollipop, did not look where he was going."

    Substantive adjectives act almost as nouns. One way this can happen is if a noun is elided and an attributive adjective is left behind. In the sentence, "I read two books to them; he preferred the sad book, but she preferred the happy," happy is a substantive adjective, short for "happy one" or "happy book". Another way this can happen is in phrases like "out with the old, in with the new", where "the old" means, "that which is old" or "all that is old", and similarly with "the new". In such cases, the adjective functions either as a mass noun (as in the preceding example) or as a plural count noun, as in "The meek shall inherit the Earth", where "the meek" means "those who are meek" or "all who are meek".

    Classes of adjectives

    There are 6 classes of adjectives in the English language:

    Numeric: six, three hundred

    Quantitative: more, all, some, half, more than enough

    Qualitative: Relates to colour, size, smell etc.

    Possessive: my, his, their, your

    Interrogative: which, whose, what

    Demonstrative: this, that, those, these

    Adjectives also have different levels of intensity (See, superlative, comparative, nominative)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adjective

  • 4 years ago

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    RE:

    what are the kinds of Adjective?please put the definition for each kind of adjective. thank you.?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    There are 5 kinds of adjectives. Common, Proper, Compound, Articles and Indefinite.

    Read about them here.

    http://www.infoplease.com/cig/grammar-style/adject...

  • 1 decade ago

    Classes of adjective:

    There are 6 classes of adjectives in the English language:

    1.Numeric: six, three hundred.

    2.Quantitative: more, all, some, half, more than enough.

    3.Qualitative: Relates to colour, size, smell etc.

    4.Possessive: my, his, their, your.

    5.Interrogative: which, whose, what

    6.Demonstrative: this, that, those, these

    *Adjectives also have different levels of intensity (See, superlative, comparative, nominative).

    Types of adjectives:

    Attributive, predicative, absolute, and substantive adjectives.

    A given occurrence of an adjective can generally be classified into one of four kinds of uses:

    a) Attributive adjectives are part of the noun phrase headed by the noun they modify; for example, happy is an attributive adjective in "happy kids". In some languages, attributive adjectives precede their nouns; in others, they follow their nouns; and in yet others, it depends on the adjective, or on the exact relationship of the adjective to the noun. In English, attributive adjectives usually precede their nouns in simple phrases, but often follow their nouns when the adjective is modified or qualified by a phrase acting as an adverb. For example: "I saw three happy kids", and "I saw three kids happy enough to jump up and down with glee".

    b) Predicative adjectives are linked via a copula or other linking mechanism to the noun or pronoun they modify; for example, happy is a predicate adjective in "they are happy" and in "that made me happy". (See also: predicative, subject complement.)

    c) Absolute adjectives do not belong to a larger construction (aside from a larger adjective phrase), and typically modify either the subject of a sentence or whatever noun or pronoun they are closest to; for example, happy is an absolute adjective in "The boy, happy with his lollipop, did not look where he was going."

    d) Substantive adjectives act almost as nouns. One way this can happen is if a noun is elided and an attributive adjective is left behind. In the sentence, "I read two books to them; he preferred the sad book, but she preferred the happy," happy is a substantive adjective, short for "happy one" or "happy book". Another way this can happen is in phrases like "out with the old, in with the new", where "the old" means, "that which is old" or "all that is old", and similarly with "the new". In such cases, the adjective functions either as a mass noun (as in the preceding example) or as a plural count noun, as in "The meek shall inherit the Earth", where "the meek" means "those who are meek" or "all who are meek".

    Source(s): www.wikipedia.org
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  • 6 years ago

    my mission accomplish now

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