Why can't vampires cross rushing water?

Out of all the myths I've heard I've never understood this one. What would stop them from crossing rushing water? It just sounds pretty stupid to me.. What's the whole story behind that?

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Water used to be believed to weaken any earthy-supernatural powers. Water commonly acts as a barrier (though some legends also has it act as a gateway). Anyways, in the old days it was believed vampires drew their power from earth (seeing as they returned from the grave), and running water would drain it away. By the way, according to a few folktales pixies, faeries and the like couldn't cross salt water.

  • Donna
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

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    Drowning has little to do with it, as crossing running water would typically be done by fording or, say, a bridge. The breath thing is a red herring. As repeatedly mentioned above: running water is thought to be pure in a variety of religions (probably caused by the fact fast running water, unlike stagnent water, is less likely to hold diseases or bacteria that cause them, they are rushed away, though people did not know this then). Vampires are unholy, unclean things, and thus repelled by the clean and pure, such as running water, or whatever the local Holy symbols were (i.e. crosses). Or silver or salt, both sometimes used to purify food/water (less often with silver, but it does have some germicidal properties). So unholy things are typically repelled by these clean things. A possible cause of this myth: certain wasting diseases commonly thought in less educated times to be the work of a vampires (i.e. consumption) would not be transmitted as readily across running water, so the "vampire" would seem to have no effect across the river, thus obviously could not have crossed it. Stagent rivers would likely caused or increased likelihood of diseases (cholerea, malaria) which may have been misinterpreted as the work of a vampire. I know this is slightly irrelevant to the question.

  • crantz
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    Vampires And Water

  • 5 years ago

    It could be as simple as mass and displaced water. If we assume a vampire has little fat and thicker muscle/bone mass and is therefore heavier than average as muscle is heavier than fat. Then we can assume that they'd sink like a rock in water, humans being near neutrally buoyant. If we also assume that vampires also need to breath despite an incredibly slow heart rate then drowning would be a serious danger for them. But then, there's no such thing as vampires, I should know as I am one *grin*

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  • 1 decade ago

    The origin of the myth was that running water was holy, as Jesus and others were baptized in rivers. As vampires were unholy creatures, the water would not allow them to pass, like the myth that a witch would float because she had thrown off her baptism. The water itself would not accept them.

  • It is just a myth I never got it either but we can cross running water. Holy water doesn't hurt at all neither does the cross or garlic because WE ARE NOT EVIL!!!!!!! We don't drain unwilling victims in the night. Some don't even drink blood.

    I am happy to answer any questions just email me

  • 4 years ago

    Because vampires aren't real

  • 1 decade ago

    From what I have learned myself, "evil" (or negative energy) can't cross water. I haven't heard it in reference to vampires specifically, nor do I exactly know why.

    Hey: I just asked my friend who knows about these things and he said, "Water reflects."

    Now that would make sense if reflective surfaces aren't vampire friendly.

    Source(s): what I've heard and experienced myself, and my friend
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Because the people who made up stories about vampires said so. It's like how witches can't stand on holy ground (graveyards, etc).

    • Kevin2 years agoReport

      That's a horrible reason that doesn't tell us anything. Instead of saying "Because" ask why the storyteller made that choice. What do they mean to communicate directly, thematically or symbolically with their choice? Vampires originally were always tied with a perversion of the holy. See Bram Stoker

  • 1 decade ago

    Ive heard it, Im not sure the story behind it, something about water burning them..but that would only make sense if its holy water..so Im just as stumped as you. Sorry.

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