Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Education & ReferenceHomework Help · 1 decade ago

What is social context, it is supposed to be related with setting.?

subject- english

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Yes. Social context is circumstances surrounding the story... the situation... what's happening in the society of where the story takes place.

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  • matzen
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    Social Context

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  • 4 years ago

    For the best answers, search on this site https://shorturl.im/0YjZk

    This is an interesting question. I'd have to say that, without the religious necessity, the Bible, if it were not the Bible, would not be canonized. So what we'd be left with would be the same segments it was broken down into prior to its canonization by the early church fathers. We would have the histories of the Israelites. (Kings and such would be the best examples of this. The very early works, Genesis and Exodus, would likely be regarded as Epics of Jewish tradition.) We would have the books of Law of the Isrealites (Leviticus, Deuteronomy,etc). There would be, as they are still known today, the books of wisdom. The prophets and prophecies is where we would see the most significant change in interpretation, I think. They would likely be viewed as political and social commentary. The Gospels would be political and spiritual works, probably with a large emphasis on the revolutionary attributes of Christ and His leadership. The Man was, after all, the most significant social/human-rights revolutionary in history. The epistles of Paul and other apostles, in my best estimation, would be primarily forgotten as oddities, for without the religious structure surrounding them (which does as much damage to their true intent and meaning as our vast ignorance of their historical setting) they lose most of their value to the modern world. Some chapters would likely be brought up in Philosophy courses, but nothing is said there that isn't said elsewhere and in more ancient (read: authoritative) tongue. Of course, the Bible and its segments are often studied in the contexts I provided above. To many scholars the canonization is dangerous and erroneous. Collected as one book (more properly an Anthology spanning thousands of years), people feel free to grossly abuse it to suit their needs, completely ignoring the true nature and purpose of the individual books and assuming some mystical tie in from one work to the other where no logical tie in often exists. The writing criticism and popularity would mirror that of other ancient texts, meaning largely that the large majority wouldn't care and the academics would consider it invaluable to understanding history and literature. And based on its history, span of time, varying subject matter, and form it would not and can not be considered a novel, and all the proposed "pop writing" questions that depend on that characterization would become unnecessary to answer. (For instance, regarding the characterization of Christ, since he is a confirmed historical figure [see Josephus] this wouldn't be an issue for debate.)

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  • 1 decade ago

    Like R K said, it involves what is going on. It can involve the time period, an event that is going on, social class or relations between social classes. All of these things put the story into a perspective that would then drive the actions, thoughts and feelings of the characters.

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  • 4 years ago

    It depends

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  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    k

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