T-Bone
Lv 7
T-Bone asked in Politics & GovernmentPolitics · 1 decade ago

With the problem of worldwide food shortages, your opinion that 40% US corn crop going to Ethanol production?

What say you?

24 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    this thing has gotten a little nutty "corn is food"...

    my sister has been running Ethanol, it doesn't cost any less than regular gas and she said she gets about 50 or more miles less per tank when running the Ethanol blend in other words it cost more to run Ethanol in her car than regular gas...

    always nosnod

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  • 1 decade ago

    I say you don't have a clue. Food grade corn is not used to make ethanol. The price paid to the farmer for food grade corn is 70cents to 90cents above the price paid for #2 yellow corn (which is what ethanol is made from when corn is used). There will not be a shortage of food grade corn for this very reason. That and the fact that there aren't that many more ethanol plants on-line now than 5 years ago. The number of corn acres has been increasing for the last 2 years. Carryout (grain left in storage) hasn't changed. The price paid to the farmer/rancher for live cattle is nearly the same as it was in the late '80's and early '90's when the price of corn was less than $3 per bushel. Explain that to me.

    BTW Dick tater, what would YOU do to increase fuel production? Would you allow more exploration and recovery of oil/natural gas from our own country? What are you doing to try to produce a form of fuel to power vehicles? Get off your high horse. Lead, follow, or get out of the way!

    EDIT: Using corn for ethanol is just a first step. Ethanol producers realize there are better sources. Using corn to get plants up and going is simply the easiest way to start. When other sources become economically feasible, plants will switch over, But, understand, that some crops will not grow throughout the entire country. Corn will.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I really don't believe the corn crop subsidies for more corn for ethanol contributes to food shortages in Bangladesh. It is more a function of globalization and the WTO.

    That said, I don't think ethanol from corn is a good solution, at best it is short term. Ethanol from other non food biomass is already being done on a pilot scale and will soon overtake corn or other foods.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It is silly to use the corn for that purpose, however sugar can and sugar beets actually produce better ethanol wouldn't take as much from the food resource as corn does. Then again maybe taking a better look at our own farm subsidies of paying farmers not to grow certain crops could also be reworked.

    • random_man
      Lv 7
      5 years agoReport

      There are no subsidies that pay farmers not to grow crops.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    There is no more of a food supply problem now than there is in any given year. What is a problem is prices are out of control because commodity indexed derrivatives (for the 10 most common comodities that make up those indexes) are driving up prices.

    It makes no difference if speculators never intend on taking delivery of a commodity when they are investing in these funds. Their input into the market is the same as real demand even though they will never take delivery of the commodity, and worse... it's highly leveraged, so... for example, I could spend 10.4 million dollars on a fund that turns around and uses that to basically buy long, and that makes it appear like I just drove up the demand of oil by 1 million barrels even though I will never take delivery of the oil because it is just commodity swaps that underpin my investment.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Corn ethanol is an inefficient use of energy. Brazil uses the more efficient sugar cane ethanol. We could switch from using corn for ethanol to cellulosic corn ethanol and that would not adversely affect any food supply.

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  • ?
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Considering the government also uses subsidies to keep corn at artificially competitive prices, the cost of food is hardly an issue for them. That said, it is a very energy-intensive process to convert tar sands to petroleum. The pipeline would just be part of an overall process to use this as a viable energy option.

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  • whimsy
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    Actually, modern crop production requires more energy input from fossil fuels that we get in return in caloric energy from the biomass. It is our reliance on formerly cheap fuel to grow crops that is causing us chagrin.

    The rising energy costs are the cause of food prices (there is no shortage of either food or energy, btw, only that the prices have jumped)

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Highly against it. Our dependency on oil got out of hand 50 years ago. Now it is just a mess, with barely any public transportation and the distance between work place and home being beyond walking distance.

    I am very supportive over projects researching solar energy. Harnessing solar energy is both environmentally friendly and practically unlimited.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The same experts who told Congress that ethanol subsidies and production would lower gasoline prices also told Congress that there is a global warming crisis. Myopic thinking pervades.

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