how can i tune my acoustic guitar to A at 432 hz?

i heard it sounds better at that pitch but where do i begin.?? my only tuner is set at 440hz.

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Without an adjustable tuner it's pretty tough to be accurate. If you have an adjustable electronic keyboard you can guesstimate with that. The good news though is that the difference between A440 and A432 is very negligible. Here's the math. According to my J. Cree Fischer "Piano Tuning-A Simple and Accurate Method for Amateurs" p.148, the formula for figuring out a major 7th higher (in this case G#-Ab) would be f x 15/8. (f=frequency) We know that half of A440, or A220, would be an octave below. When we multiply 220 x 15/8 (1.875) we get 412.5 for the frequency of Ab. 440-412.5=27.5 If we divide 27.5 by 8 (440-432) we get 3.44. this means that dropping A down to 432 will only drop the pitch less than 1/3 of a semitone (half step). Not much! Now after all that, here's a simple test. Record yourself with these two tunings and do a "blindfold" test. See if you can tell the difference. In the U.S. the standard is A440. In other countries around the world there is some variation but it us usually up to A445 or so. My personal opinion is that there's not much noticeable difference in the sound until you drop the tuning a whole step and put the strings to D-G-C-F-A-D (from 6th to 1st) or even just drop D tuning (lower 6th to D). I hope this has been more helpful than tedious! joeteach123

    Source(s): J. Cree Fischer "Piano Tuning-A Simple and Accurate Mehtod for Amateurs" p.148
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  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    432 Hz Guitar Tuning

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  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    432 Hz Guitar Tuner

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  • 1 decade ago

    As a rough guide, A=432 will be very nearly a quarter tone lower than standard. You could try that to give yourself an idea of how your guitar would sound at a lower pitch before splashing out on a fancy electronic tuning gizmo. Bear in mind that the string tension will be lower if flat, meaning that you might lose a little projection (ie it might be a little quieter due to the reduced tension).

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  • 1 decade ago

    If you have a good ear then you can probably do it if you have a reference tone at thet pitch, though there are some tuners, like the one I have, where you can tell it to use a different Hz pitch for A, but yours is not one that can.

    As to whether it sounds "better", I'd say that's entirely subjective.

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  • 1 decade ago

    You can by tuners that you can program to tune at any frequency...but...if you are looking for a quick fix I would just tune it to normal and THEN just tune down slightly, it might not be exact at 432 but it will be close. It's better to learn how to tune by ear anyways

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  • 1 decade ago

    There are free Internet tuners that can adjust from 420-440 Hz, if you can't tune by ear. But a true A is tuned at 440 Hz and I suggest you keep it that way at the risk of sounding horribly flat.

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  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    I'm not sure if this answers your question, but in Western tuning, the note 'A' is 440hz. Are you tuning the right string to that note (outside strings are E).

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  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    A good virtual tuner you can use is "free guitar tuner" -> http://bitly.com/1AypSFo

    I have been using it for years

    Good Bye

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  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    1

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