Can someone please explain to me how these Christian wristbands are "idolatry"?

I'm accustomed to seeing the word "idolatry" flung around when it comes to Catholicism ... erroneously ... but that's not what this is about. Two of the answers to this... show more I'm accustomed to seeing the word "idolatry" flung around when it comes to Catholicism ... erroneously ... but that's not what this is about.

Two of the answers to this question
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=Ajyum_vCDgJ1ukACf1asHazsy6IX;_ylv=3?qid=20080503055416AARDgKP

concerning wristbands with a Christian message/purpose assert that even these are "idolatry, not in the Bible, false doctrine".

We're talking this sort of thing: http://www.christianbook.com/Christian/Books/gift_results?page=1065851&sp=87161&event=51500GNF%7C1242306%7C87260

So am I correct in assuming that according to some, wearing ANYTHING related to one's faith is "idolatry"? Including words on a flexible rubber wristband?

Please note that although a Catholic is asking the question, the items under discussion are NOT specifically Catholic and can be found in just about any (evangelical) Christian bookstore.
Update: Mr. Got Suspended, you must have taken a wrong turn on your way to the Poetry section ... but you're welcome to the two points anyway.
Update 2: To 1985: You said "...That does not necessarily make them the final authority on said subject." True. And that's one very good reason why there needs to be an authority. You also said " Just as you believe that those who relate idolatry to Catholicism are in error, those who believe that... show more To 1985: You said "...That does not necessarily make them the final authority on said subject." True. And that's one very good reason why there needs to be an authority.

You also said " Just as you believe that those who relate idolatry to Catholicism are in error, those who believe that the wearing of a simple silicone bracelet can lead to or is idolatry are in error in some people's views, while others will agree with them."

This is sounding very close to the "relativity" that secularists apply to something else -- morality -- by saying "what's right for me is not necessarily what's right for you". With respect, my sister: There are some things that cannot be relative. The correct application of the commandment against idolatry is, I submit, one of them. Many thanks for your considered response, though, and God bless you as well.
Update 3: ... Which leads me to my choice (a very tough one!) for best answer.
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