Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Education & ReferenceHomework Help · 1 decade ago

Intresting Facts on Indonesia? or Info on a current problem there?

I have been researching Indonesia for about 2 weeks now. i have to write a speech ( 10 min long ) and i need some facts or attention getters that i cant seem to find. I have searched so many website but most of them say the same thing over and over again... please help speech is in two days...

2 Answers

Relevance
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Conservatism... the chasity belts they have to wear. Some people consider this a problem. But that's just a funny one I thought I would throw in. I listed a source for it too. Check out the sites for problems dealing with Wildlife, Drugs, and The Economy.

    I listed the sources, be sure to read the excerpts below too.

    On paper," says Asia Times Online (Hong Kong), "Indonesia has all the resources to become a major economic power." But there are problems-major problems. When Market: Asia Pacific last reviewed Indonesia's economy (15:3, March 2006) we detailed the government's deep involvement in the private sector. In its closely reasoned piece (May 19, 2006) from which the opening quote is taken, however, Asia Times describes how convoluted the political morass is for the current president, in spite of his acknowledged "ambition" to energize economic growth.

    JAKARTA, INDONESIA -- Chastity belts, which went out of fashion with knights in shining armor and damsels in distress, are making a comeback in the massage parlors of East Java.

    In a bid to prevent any hanky-panky between masseuses and their clients, several massage parlors in the hill resort town of Batu are insisting that the women wear padlocks across the zippers of their work pants. [its funny but serious at the same time :P]

    Two years ago, Indonesian authorities tied a 32-year-old Thai woman named Namsong Sirilak and a 62-year-old Indian named Saelow Prasert to palm trees at dawn in northern Sumatra and shot them for trafficking in heroin -- only weeks after the execution of their Indian accomplice, Ayodhya Prasad Chaubey.

    That might have been a spectacular answer to Indonesia’s growing problem with illegal drugs, but so far it doesn’t seem to be doing much good. Despite Jakarta’s declaration of war on drugs, traffickers continue to tap into the increasingly lucrative Indonesian market, already awash with cheap speed, ecstasy and heroin as the archipelago nation begins to catch up with the drug use problems that Malaysia, Thailand and the Philippines especially have been fighting for decades.

    On the surface, Indonesia’s environmental problems – deforestation, wildlife trade, pollution, overfishing etc – and vanishing natural resources appear to be issues of poverty, population pressure and poor governance.

    In reality, the situation is more complex.

    Across the world, a growing appetite for Indonesia’s fish, oil palm, timber, wood pulp, gold, oil and gas resources are pressing the country to keep on exporting its natural heritage in the form of oils, logs, fish fillets and photocopy paper.

    The problem is that a lot of these activities are taking place illegally and/or are carried out in an unsustainable way.

    So what environmental problems is Indonesia facing?

    During 2000 and 2005, the UN Food and Agriculture Organization estimates that Indonesia lost a massive 1,87 million ha of forest every year.1 That’s 9,36 million ha over a 5-year period – an area the size of Portugal.

    Pollution

    About 96% of Indonesians live within 100 km of the coast,8 placing huge demands on the country’s coastal environment.

    Rapid economic development, particularly around major population centres results in large amounts of sewage and industrial pollution, causing the decline of many reef areas especially those near growing cities such as Jakarta, Ambon and Ujung Pandang.9

    There are also environmental problems linked to rapid urbanization and economic development, such as air pollution, traffic congestion, garbage management, and reliable water and waste water services.10

  • 5 years ago

    Charlie Brown's dad was a barber. Belut is a Phillipino delcacy. A dork is a whale penis. Head and blowjoobs aren't the same thing. Marijuana is the second most used drug next to alcohol. There are usually about 178 seeds on a Big Mac. A tied knot is a symbol of love. Hints the expression "tying the knot" A long time ago, French kissing was believed to join souls together Megan Fox has toe thumbs. There are more kangaroos in the Austrailia than people. Butterflies taste with their feet. The plastic on the end of shoelaces is called an aglet. The FOIL method in Algebra stands for First Outside Inside Last. Diet Coke wasn't founded unitl 1982. The movie Across the Universe was filmed at Princeton University. Elves traditionally sat on people's chests while they slept to give them bad dreams. Qa is a Babylonian liquid measurement. Great Scrable word. Studies have shown that Jesus was probably born in June, not December. Gagaku is the Japanese term for a type of East Asian music that was popular during the 5th-8th centuries. When Mozart was 13, he heard the secret chorus of the Sistine Choir and copied it out from memory. Smiling makes you happier. There are phobias where you are afraid of air, food, and water. Not all three at the same time though. The president during the 1920's was Calvin Coolidge Shakesheare was born on Stratford-on-Avon, England Bryon De La Beckwith shot Medger Evers who was a civil rights activist. Toy Story 3 comes out on June 18th 2010. Be there or be squared. Babies masturbate in the womb.

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.