Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Education & ReferenceWords & Wordplay · 1 decade ago

Is the word "hysterical" sexist?

how is the word "hysterical" sexist?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    While 'hysterical' is usually applied to females, it is non gender specific. Anyone can be hysterical.

    No, it's not sexist.

    Its sexist connotation comes from its origin.

    It's origin is 'womb' from 'hyster'. Originally defined as a neurotic condition peculiar to women and thought to be caused by a dysfunction of the uterus. Hysterics is 1727; hysteria, abstract noun, formed 1801.

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  • 1 decade ago

    The word hystera is Ancient Greek for uterus. The Greeks were the first to associate extreme emotional reactions of females with the uterus and the term hysteria. That was over two thousand years ago. The word "sexist" did not appear in the Webster's that I owned 40 years ago.

    This is a case of yet another "inconvenient truth" being labelled either sexist or racist by revisionist social activists.

    Edit - Zuzu. Why not indeed? I'd have no objection to that if the word "macho" didn't already do the job. I freely admit that we males have characteristics that are as alien to you as some of yours are alien to us. I just detest the admixture of politics and anthropology.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Hysterical come from the Greek word "husterikos" meaning of the womb, because in the Dark Ages hysteria was thought to be more prevalent among women. In modern times, with women living independently and freely, this has proven inaccurate.

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  • rini
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    i've got heard the two women and adult adult males human beings be called perves. To be trustworthy, nevertheless, i think of the which skill is harsher for adult adult males - like a Peeping Tom, an uncle who comes directly to his niece, or a clergyman who is going after little boys or a flasher in an alley with a trench coat and no pants. for a woman it quite is purely a woman who likes to talk approximately intercourse quite often or who likes intercourse - so in terms of the connotations it must be a be sexist.

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  • It seems that there is no argument that the origin of the word was very gender specific. To link its use. In a feminine context perpetuates the abuse, especially when it is being used to degrade a woman. Rabdrake

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  • 1 decade ago

    Refers to the womb. Has the same root as the word hysterectomy.

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  • 1 decade ago

    How about "testerical" for men?

    Hey, Picador - I totally agree. I just thought if we were going to get ridiculous here, we could go ahead and start making up another language...but I guess that is already being done, isn't it.

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