Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureReligion & Spirituality · 1 decade ago

St. Peter and the Catholic Church?

I am a Lutheran Christian and I just got done learning a little more about the history of my church via the movie Luther, and it taught me a thing or two about the Catholic church, and how they liked to strike fear in the members hearts by telling them stuff like "pay a finacial contribution or suffer eternal damnation" and all that jazz. So it is quite clear to me that the Catholic church was run by some bad people and is pretty ungodly at times.

Well my question is about St. Peter. Apparently he was the founder of the church? What is up with that?.I really hope Peter didn't believe in all those things like taking peoples money in order to save their deceased family members from purgatory, because that is nonsense. God is a bt more loving then THAT. So was all this St. Peters idea? Or did it all start after Peter died?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    In the context of History, the movie is very accurate.

    Some of our Catholic friends look at such things in the context of emotion, but even the Catholic Church reformed as a result of the Lutheran Reformation with what is known as the counter-reformation. There has always been an open dialog between the Lutheran and Catholic Church. Recent statements by the Pope have shown that the RC Church now acknowledges us as Christian. The accept our baptism as valid, but for some reason do not accept our Eucharist.

    Peter was certainly appointed by Christ as the leader of the Apostles, but the Church did indeed start in Jerusalem, and we know that the first Bishop of Jerusalem was James. This is the same James who's Osiary was allegedly found a few years ago and has been in the news recently.

    One answer stated that indulgences were not "sanctioned by the Church, yet the purpose of the indulgences that were being sold at that time was to raise money for the building of St. Peters Basilica in Rome.

    St. Peter would have been "Pi**ed off", read your Bible, he and Paul were "no BS" kind of guys.

    In the Lutheran Church we Commemorate both St. Peter and St. Paul on their feast day; June 29, and the Confession of St. Peter on Jan. 18.

    Mark

    Addendum:

    The Reformation was started by Roman Catholic Clergy and Bishops who actually read and understood Scripture.

  • Daver
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    <<I am a Lutheran Christian and I just got done learning a little more about the history of my church via the movie Luther, and it taught me a thing or two about the Catholic church,>>

    Since when do movies have Infallible teaching authority? I thought, as Protestants believe, only the Bible has the supreme and infallible authority to teach?

    <<and how they liked to strike fear in the members hearts by telling them stuff like "pay a finacial contribution or suffer eternal damnation" and all that jazz.>>

    Really. If only you could favor me with some Biblical context for your argument.

    <<So it is quite clear to me that the Catholic church was run by some bad people and is pretty ungodly at times.>>

    I'm still waiting for Biblical evidence of your anti-Catholic claims.

    <<Well my question is about St. Peter. Apparently he was the founder of the church? What is up with that?>>

    There's no "apparently". Saint Peter WAS the first pope of the Catholic Church.

    <<I really hope Peter didn't believe in all those things like taking peoples money in order to save their deceased family members from purgatory, because that is nonsense. God is a bt more loving then THAT>>

    Many non-Catholic Christians misunderstand exactly what Indulgences are. Most will try to find the answer from an Authoritative source rather than some movie.

    INDULGENCE - "The remission before God of the temporal punishment due to sins forgiven as far as their guilt is concerned, which the follower of Christ with the proper dispositions and under certain determined conditions acquires through the intervention of the Church, which, as minister of the redemption, authoritatively dispenses and applies the treasury of the satisfaction won by Christ and the saints" (Pope Paul VI, Apostolic Constitution on Indulgences).

    As originally understood, an indulgence was a mitigation of the severe canonical penances imposed on the faithful for grave sins. The term "indulgence" remained, however, even after these extreme penalties were discontinued. Yet until the Second Vatican Council, the norm for determining the effectiveness of an indulgenced practice was its relationship to the ancient canonical penances, as seen in the numbers, so many years or so many days, attached to every official listing of partial indulgences.

    All this changed by Pope Paul VI. From now on the measure of how efficacious an indulgenced work is depends on two things: The supernatural charity with which the indulgenced task is done, and the perfection of the task itself.

    Another innovation is that partial and plenary indulgences can always be applied to the dead by way of suffrage, asking God to remit their sufferings if they are still in purgatory.

    <<So was all this St. Peters idea? Or did it all start after Peter died?>>

    Indulgences, properly understood that is, Purgatory - it's all in the Bible. Try reading the Bible instead of getting pointers instead of relying on Hollywood's idea of history.

  • 1 decade ago

    The problem is in your film. Those "financial contributions" are reference to the selling of indulgences.

    First, the selling of indulgences was never sanctioned by the church - it was a fringe occurence. Second, not buying them did not get one condemned to hell.

    It wasn't the prettiest moment in Catholic history. But then again, a Lutheran's general lack of reverence for Mary and rejection of purgatory would have made Martin Luther cry.

    No, Peter didn't believe all those things. People are human. People sin. Even popes and other church officials. No matter what sect of Christianity you look in, you will find it rampant with sinners all the way to the top. That's not exactly a reason to reject a faith, otherwise you'd reject all of them.

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    Tebone gives the complete answer about Peter. Paul was one of the Apostles, an especially gifted teacher sent out by the leaders of the Church to spread the gospel. Here's the evidence that Paul was under Peter's authority: When the Judaizing Christians insisted that converts from paganism to Christianity should be subjected to the Law of Moses, Paul and Barnabas were sent from Antioch to Jerusalem, to consult "the apostles and presbyters at Jerusalem about this question" (Acts 15:2); and, after a long debate, Peter got up and said to them: "Brethren, you know that in early days God made choice among us, that through my mouth the Gentiles should hear the word of the Gospel and believe. And God who knows the heart, bore witness by giving them the Holy Spirit just as He did to us.... Why then do you now try to test God by putting on the neck of the disciples a yoke which neither our fathers nor we have been able to bear? But we believe that we are saved through the grace of the Lord Jesus, just as they are" (Acts 15:7-11). Then it was that "the whole meeting quieted down" (Acts 15:12). Cheers, Bruce

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  • 1 decade ago

    As far as I'm aware St. Peter never did any of that....

    St. Peter was a Martyr, and was Crucified....

    But there have been many bad people in the Chruch over it's history....But I don't think St. Peter was the start of all that....I think when all the horrible things started happening in the Church is when the men started realizing they had full power over many things, to much power over many things, and started horrible corruption within the chruch....However it's not like that anymore, nor has it been for quite some time....

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    >>I just got done learning a little more about the history of my church via the movie Luther, and it taught me a thing or two about the Catholic church<<

    Yeah, I learned about the Nazi party via the movie 'Triumph of the Will'. Do you really expect a movie conceived, produced, and financed by a Lutheran group to be fair to the Catholic Church?

  • juexue
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    You can't expect from unbiased information about history in a commercial movie.

    There was sure some abuse and bad practices in the Catholic Church at the times of Luther, but it was far from universal, and much of it clearly condemned from Rome already at that same time. Of course it's not a Catholic teaching that you can buy yoruself (or others) free from eternal damnation, and it never was.

  • 1 decade ago

    That movie was false propaganda. As a Christian you should be more careful about spreading lies about the Church. How many souls go to hell because they believe Luther's doctrine of sola fide, which is contradicted by the Bible. The only time the words "faith" and "alone" appear in the Bible is to contradict Luther's false doctrine:

    James 2:17

    Even so faith, if it hath not works, is dead, being alone.

    Leave Luther's "church" and come back to the Church founded by Christ, with the descendant of Peter as its head.

    I invite you to my group if you do not fear discussion:

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/catholicbible/

    I will show you that Luther's doctrines are not biblical and that he was a bad man who preached rebellion, violence and unchastity. Do you have the guts to find out the truth?

  • 1 decade ago

    to be blunt - it started when men tried to corrupt the church for their own personal gain. the Catholic church has been around for centuries. things were moving along after Peter for quite come time - however then men stepped into the picture. thankfully there were many changes to the corruption.

    any organization that has been around as long as the Rcc WILL have had their share of ups and downs.

  • Jade
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    Well I can see by you just describing that that it happened after Peter died. By looking at the life of Peter we can see that Peter would have never been engaged in that.

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